S-1
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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 23, 2017.

Registration Statement No. 333-          

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

EVERBRIDGE, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   7372   26-2919312

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

25 Corporate Drive, Suite 400

Burlington, Massachusetts 01803

(818) 230-9700

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

 

Jaime Ellertson

President and Chief Executive Officer

Everbridge, Inc.

25 Corporate Drive, Suite 400

Burlington, Massachusetts 01803

(818) 230-9700

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

Copies to:

 

C. Thomas Hopkins, Esq.

Nicole C. Brookshire, Esq.

Richard C. Segal, Esq.

Cooley LLP

1333 2nd Street, Suite 400

Santa Monica, California 90401

(310) 883-6400

 

Kenneth S. Goldman

Elliot J. Mark, Esq.

Everbridge, Inc.

25 Corporate Drive, Suite 400

Burlington, Massachusetts 01803

(818) 230-9700

 

Kenneth J. Gordon, Esq.

Goodwin Procter LLP

100 Northern Avenue

Boston, Massachusetts 02210

(617) 570-1000

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.

 

 

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, check the following box.  ☐

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer  ☐

   Accelerated Filer  ☐   Non-accelerated Filer  ☒    Smaller Reporting Company  ☐

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Securities Being Registered  

Proposed

Maximum
Aggregate
Offering Price(1)(2)

  Amount of
Registration Fee

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

  $50,000,000   $5,795

 

 

(1) In accordance with Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the number of shares being registered and the proposed maximum offering price per share are not included in this table.
(2) Estimated solely for purposes of computing the amount of the registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. Includes the offering price of shares that the underwriters have the option to purchase.

The registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment that specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


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The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We and the selling stockholders may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and we and the selling stockholders are not soliciting offers to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED MARCH 23, 2017

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

                    Shares

 

LOGO

Common Stock

 

 

We are selling                 shares of common stock and the selling stockholders are selling                 shares of common stock. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the shares of common stock sold by the selling stockholders.

Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “EVBG.” On March 22, 2017, the closing price of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market was $19.33 per share.

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined under the U.S. federal securities laws and have elected to comply with certain reduced public company disclosure and reporting requirements for this prospectus and other filings. See “Prospectus Summary—Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company.”

The underwriters have an option to purchase a maximum of                 additional shares from the selling stockholders at the public offering price, less underwriting discounts and commissions, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.

Investing in our common stock involves risks. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 17.

 

      

Price to Public

    

Underwriting
Discounts and
Commissions(1)

    

Proceeds to

Everbridge, Inc.

    

Proceeds to
Selling
Stockholders

Per Share

     $              $              $              $        

Total

     $                      $                      $                      $                

 

(1) See “Underwriting” beginning on page 132 for additional information regarding underwriting compensation.

The underwriters expect to deliver the shares of our common stock on or about             , 2017.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

Credit Suisse    BofA Merrill Lynch
Stifel   

Pacific Crest Securities

a division of KeyBanc Capital Markets

Canaccord Genuity   

Raymond James

   Needham & Company    William Blair

The date of this prospectus is                 , 2017


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

     Page  

Prospectus Summary

     1  

Risk Factors

     17  
Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements      42  

Industry and Market Data

     44  

Use of Proceeds

     45  

Market Price of Common Stock

     46  

Dividend Policy

     47  

Capitalization

     48  

Dilution

     49  

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

     50  
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      52  

Business

     76  
     Page  
Management      97  
Executive and Director Compensation      104  
Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions      117  
Principal and Selling Stockholders      119  
Description of Capital Stock      121  
Shares Eligible for Future Sale      126  
Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations for Non-U.S. Holders      128  
Underwriting      132  
Legal Matters      140  
Experts      140  
Where You Can Find Additional Information      140  
Index to Consolidated Financial Statements      F-1  
 

 

 

You should rely only on the information contained in this document and any free writing prospectus we provide to you. We have not, the selling stockholders have not and the underwriters have not authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or in any

free writing prospectuses we have prepared. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. This prospectus is an offer to sell only the shares offered hereby, but only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. The information contained in this prospectus is current only as of its date.

 

 

For investors outside the United States: We have not, the selling stockholders have not and the underwriters have not done anything that would permit this offering, or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the shares of common stock and the distribution of this prospectus outside of the United States.

 

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that you should consider in making your investment decision. Before investing in our common stock, you should carefully read this entire prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and the information set forth under the sections titled “Risk Factors,” “Special Note Regarding Forward- Looking Statements,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” in each case included in this prospectus. Unless the context otherwise requires, we use the terms “Everbridge,” “company,” “our,” “us,” and “we” in this prospectus to refer to Everbridge, Inc. and, where appropriate, our consolidated subsidiaries.

EVERBRIDGE, INC.

Overview

Everbridge is a global software company that provides enterprise software applications that automate and accelerate organizations’ operational response to critical events in order to keep people safe and businesses running. During public safety threats such as active shooter situations, terrorist attacks or severe weather conditions, as well as critical business events such as IT outages, cyber-attacks or other incidents such as product recalls or supply-chain interruptions, our SaaS-based platform enables our customers to quickly and reliably aggregate and assess threat data, locate people at risk and responders able to assist, automate the execution of pre-defined communications processes, and track progress on executing response plans. Our customers use our platform to identify and assess hundreds of different types of threats to their organizations, people, assets or brand. Our solutions enable organizations to deliver intelligent, contextual messages to, and receive verification of delivery from, hundreds or millions of recipients, across multiple communications modalities such as voice, SMS and e-mail. Our applications enable the delivery of messages in near real-time to more than 100 different communication devices, in over 200 countries and territories, in 15 languages and dialects – all simultaneously. We delivered 1.5 billion communications in 2016. We automate the process of sending contextual notifications to multiple constituencies and receiving return information on a person’s or operation’s status so that organizations can act quickly and precisely. Our Critical Event Management platform is comprised of a comprehensive set of software applications that address the full spectrum of tasks an organization has to perform to manage a critical event, including Mass Notification, Incident Management, Safety Connection, IT Alerting, Visual Command Center, Crisis Commander, Community Engagement and Secure Messaging. We believe that our broad suite of integrated, enterprise applications delivered via a single global platform is a significant competitive advantage in the market for Critical Event Management solutions, which we refer to generally as CEM.

In critical situations, the speed at which threats are assessed and information is transmitted and accessed is essential. For example, United States Department of Homeland Security research indicates that the average duration of an active shooter event at a school is approximately 12.5 minutes, while the average police response time to such events is 18 minutes. Accordingly, organizations must be able to aggregate multiple types of threat and incident data and determine whether their people, assets, or suppliers could be impacted, rapidly deliver messages that are tailored to multiple, specific audiences, in precise locations and be assured of delivery. Further, the proliferation of mobile and digital communications has resulted in individuals spending less time in a fixed office location, with International Data Corporation estimating that by 2020 mobile workers will account for 72% of the total United States workforce, and this trend has simultaneously increased the number of pathways through which people receive information. These developments have made it imperative that organizations be able to locate travelling or remote workers to determine who might be impacted by a critical event, and that critical communications be delivered via voice, SMS, and email, as well as to social media, outdoor signage and personal computers. Moreover, organizations require the ability to leverage all of these pathways, individually or in sequence, to reach people in situations where a certain means of communication may be inoperative or

 



 

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individuals are not responsive to a single pathway. During public safety threats and critical business events, the ability to gather, organize and analyze data in real time, and to enable secure, scalable, reliable and automated communications to people can be essential to saving lives, protecting assets and maintaining businesses. Further, the ability to rapidly organize a response by locating available responders and reducing the time required to manage them via automated communications can also result in significant economic savings, as each minute of unplanned downtime costs organizations an average of approximately $5,600, according to Gartner, Inc.

The severity, complexity and frequency of these critical events, their implications for business performance and personal safety, and regulatory and compliance challenges are increasing. The need for active shooter preparedness and public safety protection from terrorist attacks, as well managing the response to IT outages, cyber incidents, severe weather conditions, product recalls, supply-chain interruptions, hazardous material discharges and other urgent events, drive the need for a secure, scalable and reliable CEM system that can be operated quickly and easily. In addition, there has been a rapid proliferation of connected devices and networked physical objects – the Internet of Things, or IoT – that have the capability to communicate information about status and environment and generate data that enables individuals and enterprises to take appropriate action. These dynamics have led to a growing need for solutions that can deliver comprehensive yet targeted and contextually relevant content that facilitates the desired outcomes in critical situations and overcomes the information overload that individuals face. We estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, that the market for CEM solutions represented an $18.3 billion worldwide opportunity in 2015 and is expected to grow to $41.1 billion in 2020.

Following the tragic events of 9/11, Everbridge was founded with a vision of helping people communicate effectively in critical situations. Our SaaS-based CEM platform is built on a secure, scalable and reliable infrastructure with multiple layers of redundancy to enable the rapid delivery of critical communications, with near real-time verification, over numerous devices and contact paths. Our Mass Notification application is our most established application and enables enterprises and governmental entities to aggregate and assess threat data, locate people based on their standard work or home location and send and receive two-way, contextually aware notifications to individuals or groups to keep them informed before, during and after natural or man-made disasters and other emergencies. For example, during Hurricane Sandy, our Mass Notification application was used along the U.S. East Coast to deliver more than eight million communications. By automating the delivery of these types of critical communications, we enable customers to increase the speed and accuracy of their response and reduce associated costs. Importantly, given the pressure and anxiety most people experience in critical situations, our Mass Notification application provides a simple user interface and automated workflows for ease of use. The expertise that we garnered developing our Mass Notification application and our customers’ reliance on our solutions led us to leverage our platform to deploy solutions for CEM use cases. In turn, we have developed a full suite of enterprise-scale applications that enable our customers to inform and organize people during critical situations, whether a broad audience or a targeted subset of individuals, globally or locally, and accounting for cultural, linguistic, regulatory and technological differences. As all of our applications leverage our CEM platform, customers can use a single contacts database, rules engine of algorithms and hierarchies and user interface to accomplish multiple objectives. Our applications are easy-to-use, quickly deployable and require limited implementation services and no development resources.

The following situations reflect examples of how our applications aggregate and assess data and enable improved management of critical events:

 

    When an active shooter situation or terrorist attack occurs, organizations can quickly identify employees in the affected area, including employees not at their usual business location, in order to confirm that they are safe and provide tailored instructions. For example, shelter-in-place instructions may be provided to people in an impacted building while evacuation instructions are provided to those in an adjacent building. At the same time, first responders and hospitals can use multiple modes of alerting to mobilize resources and call in staff to provide emergency care.

 



 

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    When a hurricane is imminent, local emergency management departments can alert affected communities with relevant safety and evacuation instructions while companies can put in place emergency plans to notify employees of office closures while coordinating work assignments to maintain the continuity of core operations.

 

    Companies can consolidate separate command centers for emergency operations and supply chain events, using one common data set to aggregate and assess data on severe weather, political unrest and other types of threats to their own and suppliers’ operations, thereby reducing costs while gaining efficiencies.

 

    When IT systems fail, IT administrators can shorten the time required to alert cross-department responders, use scheduling information to determine availability and quickly assemble appropriate personnel on a conference bridge, thereby reducing the costs incurred from downtime.

 

    When a patient is suspected of having a stroke, an on-call specialist can provide a patient assessment via video communications during the ambulance trip and the emergency room can be readied for an immediate stroke treatment, accelerating critical time to treatment.

 

    When a cyber incident shuts down an IT network, management can alert employees of the network shutdown via a secure, alternate communication path.

 

    When a power line is down, utility workers can utilize pre-configured incident management templates to alert affected customers and responders and provide service updates.

 

    When engine readings in critical equipment detect a malfunction, technicians with the appropriate skills can be automatically alerted and quickly deployed to minimize downtime and avoid revenue loss or service interruption.

 

    When readings from an implanted medical device are abnormal, that information can be automatically routed to the individual’s healthcare provider to enable timely medical care.

 

    When a young child goes missing, local officials can send alerts to and receive tips from their communities to aid in locating and returning the child.

 

    When a financial services firm experiences disruptions in service, clients can be promptly notified and audit confirmations can be provided to document delivery.

Our customer base has grown from 867 customers at the end of 2011 to more than 3,200 customers as of December 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2016, our customers were based in 28 countries and included eight of the 10 largest U.S. cities, eight of the 10 largest U.S.-based investment banks, 24 of the 25 busiest North American airports, six of the 10 largest global consulting firms, six of the 10 largest global auto makers, all four of the largest global accounting firms, four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health care providers and four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health insurers. We provide products and services to customers of varying sizes, including enterprises, small businesses, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and government agencies. Our customers span a wide variety of industries including technology, energy, financial services, healthcare and life sciences, manufacturing, media and entertainment, retail, higher education and professional services.

We derive substantially all of our revenue from subscriptions to our critical communications applications, which represented 97%, 97% and 96% of our total revenue in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. Historically, we derived more than 86% of our revenue in each of the last three fiscal years from sales of our Mass Notification application. Our pricing model is based on the number of applications subscribed to and, per application, the number of people, locations and things connected to our platform, as well as the volume of communications. We also offer premium services including data feeds for social media, threat intelligence and weather. We generate

 



 

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additional revenue by expanding the number of applications, number of contacts and number of devices that our customers purchase over time.

Industry Background

Over the past two decades, methods to assess critical events and to automate and accelerate the process of managing and responding to such events have evolved rapidly, in tandem with advances in technology, to include automated or system-generated responses, including voice calls, text messages, emails, social media and outdoor digital signage. In critical situations, the speed at which information is transmitted and accessed is essential.

Key Trends Driving a Fundamental Shift in Communications

Governmental entities and enterprises face increasing threats to the safety of their geographically disparate and constantly mobile residents and employees. According to the Global Terrorism Database, the number of global fatalities and injuries from terrorist acts has increased 400% from 2005 to 2015, and the world has witnessed devastating attacks in Orlando, Berlin, Brussels, Nice, San Bernardino, Istanbul and other global cities. According to estimates by the Institute for Economics and Peace, the economic cost of terrorism reached $52.9 billion in 2014. In addition, according to the Third National Climate Assessment prepared by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the United States has been experiencing severe weather events above long-term averages, with, for example, the number of heat waves in 2011 and 2012 at nearly triple the long-term average. Similarly, a PricewaterhouseCoopers study found that the number of cyber security incidents across all industries rose by 38% in 2015 versus the prior year and Lloyd’s estimates that cyber-attacks cost businesses as much $400 billion annually. Taken together, global reinsurer Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd. found that the cost of disaster events, including man-made and severe weather incidents, reached $85 billion worldwide in 2015.

At the same time, key business and technology trends continue to shift both the fundamental way that organizations communicate with relevant stakeholders and how individuals regularly consume information. People increasingly consume most of their information through mobile devices and applications as well as through social media and other digital channels. Increasingly, less information is shared using traditional “analog” communication methods, such as printed media, television and landline telephones. The proliferation of mobile and digital communications, as well as the emergence of the IoT, has accelerated the speed at which people communicate, exponentially increasing the volume of communications that individuals must process. As a result of these dynamics, it has become imperative that communications be appropriately contextualized, meaningful and actionable.

In light of these trends, communications have become one of the most important areas of technology investment. In a 2016 report, Gartner, Inc. estimates that $1.4 trillion, or 41.0%, of information technology, or IT, expenditure was for communications in 2016. Organizations are reaping the benefits of digital communications to more easily and relevantly interact with their target constituents including customers, partners, employees, residents and other key stakeholders. Likewise, as IT innovation continues to shift to on-demand models, organizations have increasingly migrated from on-premises software to cloud-based solutions in order to improve agility and efficiency when seeking to communicate with their global, mobile, distributed stakeholders.

In order to connect people across disparate communication modalities in diverse locations, organizations are increasingly investing in technologies that unify different analog and digital real-time and non-real-time communications. The integration of real-time enterprise communication services such as instant messaging and voice and video conferencing with non-real-time communication services such as voicemail, facsimile and e-mail can provide a consistent and unified user experience across multiple devices and media types.

During public safety threats and critical business events, the ability to communicate life-saving or damage-mitigating information is crucial. Speed, security, scalability and reliability of communications is essential. The severity, complexity and frequency of these critical events, their implications for personal safety or business

 



 

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performance and rising regulatory and compliance challenges are driving demand for CEM solutions, which we estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, represented an $18.3 billion worldwide market opportunity in 2015.

Evolution of Critical Event Management Solutions

Traditional solutions for critical communications have not kept pace with the increasingly digital world, the evolving threat landscape and the opportunity to leverage technological innovation to more effectively communicate with people. These solutions are often developed in-house or are not truly enterprise grade in scale and reliability, leaving many organizations to use analog, manual, one-way and people-based modalities to communicate with relevant stakeholders. These solutions lack the scale to reliably address the breadth of the different critical challenges that organizations increasingly face, the sophistication required to address evolving needs with aggregated data and analysis for threat assessment, automated workflows and the ability to rapidly deliver messages that are contextually tailored to multiple, specific audiences, in precise locations, using a variety of different communication modalities. Traditional critical communication solutions also typically send notifications based upon a person’s static work or home address. Given the mobile nature of today’s workforce, solutions now need to be able to dynamically locate who is near a critical event and send instructions to impacted parties and responders based upon where they actually are.

CEM solutions build upon the strengths of modern critical communications. Organizations today typically manage critical events across the organization in silos that use disparate data sources and unintegrated tools, making it difficult to achieve a common operational view of threats and of the status of response. Utilizing a common contact base, consistent rules engines, threat databases that are integrated with information on the location of an organization’s people, assets and suppliers, and a common visualization platform, CEM solutions can provide a more integrated solution which can improve management control and visibility and lower costs. The ability to cohesively and rapidly share information and collaborate across the organization underlies creating a common operational approach.

Requirements of Effective Critical Event Management Solutions

In order to deliver effective critical communications solutions, several requirements must be met:

 

    Comprehensive Solution.  Organizations require an enterprise-scale, comprehensive solution that can provide them with aggregated data and automated workflows and deliver intelligent, contextual messages across multiple communications modalities – all operated from desktop or mobile devices to accommodate managing critical events whenever they occur.

 

    Scalability and Speed.  Organizations require a solution that is agile and flexible enough to reach individuals at both high volume/low frequency intervals, such as emergency mass notification situations, and low volume/high frequency intervals, such as for IT alerting and secure messaging.

 

    Enterprise-Grade Reliability.  Given the inherent nature of critical events, organizations require a solution that is robust, resilient and highly redundant, with a high level of assured uptime and a low degree of fault tolerance.

 

    Situational Assessment.  Organizations require ready access to information from weather feeds, threat sources and IT monitoring systems, as well as the ability to incorporate trends from social media and feedback from their personnel in the field, in order to assess critical events and impacted areas.

 

    Dynamic Location Capability.  With today’s mobile workforce, organizations need to be able to locate and instruct impacted people, and identify and organize responders, based on where they actually are, not just based on their static office or home location.

 



 

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    Visualization.  Organizations require a visualization platform that integrates threat and incident data from a wide variety of sources, as well as updates on the status of incident response tasks, in order to improve their ability to assess the potential impact of events and the success of mitigation strategies, and to improve management control.

 

    Security and Regulatory Compliance.  Organizations require a solution that is architected to ensure data and communications security given the significance of the content being managed and the regulatory requirements that apply to the sensitive data being communicated.

 

    Intelligent Communication and Contextual Personalization.  Organizations require sophisticated, intelligent technology that can tailor both the content of communications and the modalities through which they are delivered based on differing individual preferences and roles and responsibilities within the organization.

 

    Ease-of-Use.  Given the need for speed and the pressure and anxiety most people experience in critical situations, organizations require a solution that is simple and easy-to-use, particularly when lives and property are at risk.

 

    Real-Time and After-Event Reporting and Analytics.  To ensure that organizations can measure and improve performance around critical events, a solution should provide detailed, timely and compliant reporting and analytics on organizational responsiveness and the effectiveness of communications.

 

    Global Reach and Local Expertise.  Global communications require a “local” approach to deal with the complexity of varying cultural preferences, languages and device types, as well as technical and regulatory requirements.

Key Benefits of Our Solutions and Competitive Strengths

Everbridge was founded with a vision to help organizations communicate quickly and reliably to deliver the right message, to the right people, on the right device, in the right location, at the right time during public safety threats and critical business events. Our CEM solutions enable organizations to assess threats, locate impacted people and assets, and manage and respond to critical events, all on a single platform. Key benefits of our solutions and competitive strengths include the following:

 

    Comprehensive, Enterprise-Scale Platform.  The core of our solutions is our critical communications platform, which provides multiple layers of redundancy to assure uptime and delivery of communications regardless of volume or throughput requirements. The platform is secure, scalable and reliable, enabling the delivery and verification of tens of millions of different communications virtually anywhere, in any volume, in near real-time. In 2016, we delivered 1.5 billion communications, or over 47 communications per second, through our globally distributed data centers.

 

    Out-of-the-Box, Scalable and Mobile Applications.  Our SaaS-based applications are out-of-the box, enterprise-ready and can be utilized without customer development, testing or ongoing maintenance. Regardless of a customer or prospect’s size or needs, our applications are built to scale to its largest and most complex critical communications requirements.

 

    Aggregated Threat Data and Analysis.  Our software gathers and analyzes information from weather data feeds, public safety and threat data feeds, social media, IT ticketing systems and monitoring systems, as well as inputs and feedback from two-way and polling messages. Data can be geo-mapped and threat and incident data can be used to automatically trigger simple or complex workflows that are tied to standard operating procedures or run-books.

 



 

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    Contextual Communications.  We enable intelligence and personalization in the critical communications process by delivering contextual communications. Our customers can deliver and escalate critical communications broadly to a mass population or to a targeted subset of individuals based on geographic location, skill level, role and communication modality preferences for rich, two-way collaboration.

 

    Dynamic Location Awareness.  Our platform can provide organizations with the ability to send and receive notifications based on the last known locations of people, not just based on a static office or home address. Our platform integrates with a variety of sources of location information, including building access control systems and corporate network access solutions. This location-specific approach enables organizations to quickly determine which individuals may be affected by a public safety threat or able to respond to a critical business event, and to provide targeted and relevant instructions and two- way communications.

 

    Large, Dynamic and Rich Communications Data Asset.  As of December 31, 2016, our data asset consists of our contacts databases that manage approximately 130 million contact profiles and connections from more than 3,200 customers based in 28 countries. Our contacts databases, which we refer to as contact stores, are initially created through an upload of contacts from the customer and are automatically updated with the most current contact information provided by the customer or by individuals who opt-in to receive notifications from our Community Engagement application. Our contact stores are repositories for all contact details, attributes and business rules and preferences, such as a person’s last-known location, language spoken, special needs, technical certifications and on-call status.

 

    Multi-channel Visualization.  Our platform provides the ability to create an integrated view of threats, incidents and the status of response, all within the context of the locations of an organization’s people, assets and suppliers. Multiple channels of information can be displayed side-by-side so different facets of a critical event can be monitored simultaneously, and the same data can be displayed on personal computer screens and on a large command center wall to provide flexibility in deployment.

 

    Robust Security, Industry Certification and Compliance.  Our platform is built on a secure and resilient infrastructure with multiple layers of redundancy. Many of our enterprise applications are designed to meet rigorous security and compliance requirements for financial services firms, healthcare institutions, the U.S. federal government and other regulated industries, including facilitating compliance with FINRA and HIPAA standards. Our solutions received designation under the Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technology Act of 2002, or SAFETY Act, and certification by U.S. Department of Homeland Security that places us on the approved product list for homeland security. Our solutions are also accredited under the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002, or FISMA.

 

    Automated Workflows.  Our platform automates the workflows required to complete a critical notification, including establishing the individuals within an organization authorized to send messages, the groups of stakeholders to whom messages will be sent and the content of messages to be sent to different groups of relevant stakeholders, in each case based on incident type. We believe that this automation reduces the amount of time required to send critical notification as well as the associated cost. Our platform also enables customers to automatically establish procedures for improving the success of communication efforts.

 

    Globally Local.  Our platform is designed to be utilized globally while accounting for local cultural, linguistic, regulatory and technological differences. We have relationships with suppliers and carriers in multiple countries to ensure delivery in compliance with local, technical and regulatory requirements. We have localized our user interface in 15 languages and dialects that are spoken by more than 60% of the world’s population.

 



 

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    Next-Generation, Open Architecture.  We developed our platform to easily integrate our applications with other systems. Our solutions provide open Application Program Initiatives, or APIs, and configurable integrations, enabling our platform to work with our customers’ and partners’ pre-existing processes and solutions, increasing the business value we deliver.

 

    Actionable Reporting and Analytics.  Our platform provides real-time dashboards, advanced map-based visualization and ad-hoc reporting across notifications, incidents and contacts. This information is easily accessed for required after-event reviews, continuous process improvements and regulatory compliance.

Our Growth Strategy

We intend to drive growth in our business by building on our position as a global provider of critical event management, critical communications and enterprise safety applications. Key elements of our growth strategy include:

 

    Accelerate Our Acquisition of New Customers.  We have multiple paths of entry into new customers with our portfolio of applications, which are used for a wide variety of use cases across a diverse set of verticals markets. We intend to capitalize on the breadth of our solutions and the technological advantages of our CEM platform to continue to attract new customers. In parallel, we plan to attract new customers by investing in sales and marketing and expanding our channel partner relationships.

 

    Further Penetrate Our Existing Customers.  With revenue retention rates of over 110% for each of the last three years, we believe that there is a significant opportunity within our existing customer base to expand their use of our platform, both by selling new applications and features to our existing customers and selling to additional departments in their organizations. We believe that we have a significant opportunity to increase the lifetime value of our customer relationships as we educate customers about the benefits of our current and future applications that they do not already utilize and of taking an integrated CEM approach. In the last three years we have added five new applications, which have already begun to experience significant growth. These new applications have grown from 6% in the first quarter of 2015 to 30% in the fourth quarter of 2016 of our contracted sales, which represent the total dollar value of new agreements entered into within the prior 12 months, exclusive of renewals.

 

    Develop New Applications to Target New Markets and Use Cases.  Our platform is highly flexible and can support the development of new applications to meet evolving safety and operational challenges. For example, our Safety Connection application enables organizations to locate people and send them notifications based on their dynamic last known location, while actively incorporating threat and other data to allow for targeted and relevant communications. While the historic market for corporate security and safety solutions has been focused on establishing perimeters – locks, alarms and guards – to keep threats to employees outside of the physical premises, our solutions are responsive to the dramatic shift towards an increasingly mobile workforce where employees spend less time in traditional offices. At the same time, protection of employees at traditional places of business remains crucial. Market research completed in 2016 by us together with Emergency Management & Safety Solutions, found that while organizations were very concerned about the risk of workplace violence, 79% said they were at best only somewhat prepared for an active shooter event, and communicating with people in an impacted building was seen as the biggest challenge. In light of these dynamics, we intend to continue to develop new applications for use cases in a variety of new markets and to leverage our platform and our existing customer relationships as a source of new applications, industry use cases, features and solutions.

 

    Expand Our International Footprint.  We intend to continue to expand our local presence in regions such as Europe, the Middle East and Asia to leverage our relationships with local carriers and our ability to deliver messages to over 200 countries and territories in 15 languages and dialects as well as expand our channel partnerships and also to opportunistically consider expanding in other regions.

 



 

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    Maintain Our Technology and Thought Leadership.  We will continue to invest in our core CEM platform and our applications to maintain our technology leadership position. For example, we believe that we are the only company today that provides a full, integrated CEM solution and that we provide the first solution to offer dynamic versus static location awareness integrated with analysis and communications for the employee safety and security marketplace. Further, we believe we have a competitive advantage through our commitment to innovation and thought leadership that has enabled us to take market share from our competitors and accelerate our growth.

 

    Opportunistically Pursue Acquisitions.  We plan to selectively pursue acquisitions of complementary businesses, technologies and teams that allow us to penetrate new markets and add features and functionalities to our platform.

Recent Developments

In September 2016, we closed our initial public offering, or IPO, in which we sold a total of 6,250,000 shares of our common stock. We received net cash proceeds of $66.1 million, net of underwriting discounts and commissions and other costs associated with the offering paid or payable by us.

In December 2016, we acquired 100% of the shares of Svensk Krisledning AB, or Crisis Commander. We acquired Crisis Commander for cash consideration of approximately $2.3 million with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $0.4 million. Crisis Commander is a SaaS mobile crisis management company operating out of Sweden.

In January 2017, we acquired 100% of the shares of IDV Solutions, LLC, or IDV. We acquired IDV for cash consideration of approximately $21.3 million, with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $6.2 million. IDV is a provider of threat assessment and operational visualization software located in Lansing, Michigan.

Selected Risks Affecting Our Business

Our business is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including those highlighted in the section titled “Risk Factors” immediately following this prospectus summary. These risks include, among others, the following:

 

    If our business does not grow as we expect or if we fail to manage our growth effectively, our operating results and business prospects would suffer.

 

    We have not been profitable on a consistent basis historically and may not achieve or maintain profitability in the future.

 

    Historically, we derived 96%, 91%, and 86% of our revenue from sales of our Mass Notification application in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. If we are unable to renew or increase sales of this application, or if we are unable to increase sales of our other applications, our business and operating results could be adversely affected.

 

    If we are unable to develop upgrades to our platform, develop new applications, sell our platform and applications into new markets or further penetrate our existing market, our revenue may not grow.

 

    The nature of our business exposes us to inherent liability risks.

 

    Our estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

 



 

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    The markets in which we participate are competitive, and if we do not compete effectively, our operating results could be harmed.

 

    An assertion by a third party that we are infringing its intellectual property could subject us to costly and time-consuming litigation or expensive licenses that could harm our business and results of operations.

 

    Our executive officers, directors and principal stockholders own a significant percentage of our stock and will be able to exert significant control over matters subject to stockholder approval. Following this offering, our directors, executive officers and holders of more than 5% of our common stock, some of whom are represented on our board of directors, together with their affiliates will beneficially own     % of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock, assuming that the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares.

Corporate Information

We were initially incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware under the name 3n Global, Inc. in January 2008. 3n Global, Inc. was initially a wholly-owned subsidiary of National Notification Network, LLC, which was formed in November 2002 as a limited liability company organized under the laws of the State of California. In May 2008, pursuant to a merger agreement between 3n Global, Inc. and National Notification Network, LLC, National Notification Network, LLC merged with and into 3n Global, Inc. We changed our name to Everbridge, Inc. in April 2009.

Our principal executive offices are located at 25 Corporate Drive, Suite 400, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803. Our telephone number is (818) 230-9700. Our website address is www.everbridge.com. The information contained on, or that can be accessed through, our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus, and you should not consider any information contained on, or that can be accessed through, our website as part of this prospectus or in deciding whether to purchase our common stock.

“Everbridge”, the Everbridge logo, and other trademarks or service marks of Everbridge, Inc. appearing in this prospectus are the property of Everbridge, Inc. This prospectus contains additional trade names, trademarks and service marks of others, which are the property of their respective owners. Solely for convenience, trademarks and trade names referred to in this prospectus may appear without the ® or TM symbols.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company

We qualify as an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. An emerging growth company may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other burdens that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include:

 

    a requirement to have only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related selected financial data and management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations disclosure;

 

    an exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act;

 

    an exemption from new or revised financial accounting standards until they would apply to private companies and from compliance with any new requirements adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board requiring mandatory audit firm rotation;

 

    reduced disclosure about the emerging growth company’s executive compensation arrangements; and

 

    no requirement to seek nonbinding advisory votes on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements.

 



 

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We may take advantage of some or all these provisions until we are no longer an emerging growth company. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier to occur of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenues of at least $1.0 billion or (c) in which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer,” under the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

We have chosen to “opt out” of the provision of the JOBS Act that permits emerging growth companies to take advantage of an extended transition period to comply with new or revised accounting standards applicable to public companies and, as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards as required when they are adopted. This decision to opt out of the extended transition period is irrevocable.

We have elected to adopt certain of the reduced disclosure requirements available to emerging growth companies. As a result of these elections, the information that we provide in this prospectus may be different than the information you may receive from other public companies in which you hold equity interests. In addition, it is possible that some investors will find our common stock less attractive as a result of these elections, which may result in a less active trading market for our common stock and higher volatility in our stock price.

 



 

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The Offering

 

Common stock offered by Everbridge                     shares
Common stock offered by the selling stockholders                     shares
Total common stock offered                     shares
Total common stock to be outstanding after this offering                     shares
Option offered by the selling stockholders                     shares
Use of proceeds     The principal purposes of this offering are to facilitate an orderly distribution of our shares by the selling stockholders, increase our public float and increase our financial flexibility. We plan to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital and other general corporate purposes. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of shares to be offered by the selling stockholders. See “Use of Proceeds” for additional information.
Risk factors     See “Risk Factors” and the other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common stock.
NASDAQ Global Market Symbol     “EVBG”

The number of shares of our common stock that will be outstanding after this offering is based on 27,150,674 shares of common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2016, and excludes:

 

    1,884,425 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of December 31, 2016, at a weighted-average exercise price of $10.02 per share;

 

    2,005,483 shares of our common stock reserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year; and

 

    500,000 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year.

Unless otherwise indicated, this prospectus reflects and assumes the following:

 

    no issuance or exercise of options after December 31, 2016; and

 

    no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares of our common stock.

 



 

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Summary Consolidated Financial and Other Data

We derived the summary consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2015 and 2016, and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2016, from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

When you read this summary consolidated financial data, it is important that you read it together with the historical consolidated financial statements and related notes to those statements, as well as “Selected Consolidated Financial Data” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands, except share and per share data)  

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

        

Revenue

   $ 42,421      $ 58,720      $ 76,846  

Cost of revenue:(1)

     12,089        19,789        23,767  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gross profit

     30,332        38,931        53,079  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating expenses: (1)

        

Sales and marketing

     15,818        25,925        34,847  

Research and development

     7,365        11,521        14,765  

General and administrative

     7,435        12,272        14,293  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     30,618        49,718        63,905  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating loss

     (286)        (10,787)        (10,826)  

Other expense, net

     426        599        (484)  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Loss before benefit from income taxes

     (712)        (11,386)        (11,310)  

Benefit from income taxes

     89        562        24  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (623)      $ (10,824)      $ (11,286)  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

   $ (623)      $ (10,824)      $ (11,286)  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:(2)

        

Basic

   $ (0.05)      $ (0.88)      $ (0.68)  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted

   $ (0.05)      $ (0.88)      $ (0.68)  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average common shares outstanding:(2)

        

Basic

     11,788,883        12,257,413        16,659,561  

Diluted

     11,788,883        12,257,413        16,659,561  

Other Financial Data:

        

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 7,716      $ 4,451      $ 9,503  

 



 

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  (1) Includes stock-based compensation expense and depreciation and amortization expense as follows:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Stock-based compensation expense:

        

Cost of revenue

   $ 82      $ 150      $ 180  

Sales and marketing

     120        315        725  

Research and development

     147        297        348  

General and administrative

     27        760        1,848  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

   $ 376      $ 1,522        3,101  

Depreciation and amortization expense:

        

Cost of revenue

   $ 1,615      $ 4,457      $ 6,247  

Sales and marketing

     101        227        208  

Research and development

     31        134        265  

General and administrative

     765        1,158        1,022  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total depreciation and amortization expense

   $ 2,512      $ 5,976      $ 7,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(2) See notes (2) and (14) to our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this prospectus for further details on the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders.

 

     As of December 31, 2016  
                     Actual                   
     (in thousands)  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

  

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 60,765  

Accounts receivable, net

     17,812  

Total assets

     108,322  

Total deferred revenue

     52,634  

Total liabilities

     65,970  

Accumulated deficit

     (89,618

Total stockholders’ equity

     42,352  

Other Metrics

We regularly monitor a number of financial and operating metrics in order to measure our current performance and estimate our future performance. For a further description of how we use these financial and operating metrics, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Other Metrics.”

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2014     2015     2016  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenue retention rate(1)

     111     112     116

Adjusted EBITDA(2)

   $ 2,524     $ (3,351   $ 5  

Adjusted gross margin(3)

   $ 30,663     $ 41,084     $ 55,577  

Free cash flow(4)

   $ 3,884     $ (2,953   $ 3,039  

 

(1) 

We calculate our revenue retention rate by dividing (1) total revenue in the current 12-month period from those customers who were customers during the prior 12-month period by (2) total revenue from all customers in the prior 12-month period. For the purposes of calculating our revenue retention rate, we count as customers all entities with whom we had contracts in the applicable period other than (1) customers of our wholly-owned subsidiary, Microtech, which generates an immaterial amount of our revenue in any given year and (2) in the first year following our acquisition of another business, customers that we acquired in connection with such acquisition. We believe that our ability to retain our customers and expand their use of our solutions over time is an indicator of the stability of our

 



 

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  revenue base and the long-term value of our customer relationships. Our revenue retention rate provides insight into the impact on current period revenue of the number of new customers acquired during the prior 12-month period, the timing of our implementation of those new customers, growth in the usage of our solutions by our existing customers and customer attrition. If our revenue retention rate for a period exceeds 100%, this means that the revenue retained during the period including upsells, more than offset the revenue that we lost from customers that did not renew their contracts during the period.

 

(2)  Adjusted EBITDA represents our net loss before interest income and interest expense, income tax expense and benefit, depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. We do not consider these items to be indicative of our core operating performance. The items that are non-cash include depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. Adjusted EBITDA is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans, make strategic decisions regarding the allocation of capital and invest in initiatives that are focused on cultivating new markets for our solutions. In particular, the exclusion of certain expenses in calculating adjusted EBITDA facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis. Adjusted EBITDA is not a measure calculated in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.

We believe that adjusted EBITDA provides useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our operating results in the same manner as our management and board of directors. Nevertheless, use of adjusted EBITDA has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our financial results as reported under GAAP. Some of these limitations are: (1) although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the capitalized software that is amortized will need to be replaced in the future, and adjusted EBITDA does not reflect cash capital expenditure requirements for such replacements or for new capital expenditure requirements; (2) adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs; (3) adjusted EBITDA does not reflect the potentially dilutive impact of equity-based compensation; (4) adjusted EBITDA does not reflect tax payments or receipts that may represent a reduction or increase in cash available to us; and (5) other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate adjusted EBITDA or similarly titled measures differently, which reduces the usefulness of the metric as a comparative measure. Because of these and other limitations, you should consider adjusted EBITDA alongside our other GAAP-based financial performance measures, net loss and our other GAAP financial results. The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net loss, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, for each of the periods indicated.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Net loss

   $ (623    $ (10,824    $  (11,286

Interest expense, net

     348        537        472  

Benefit from income taxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

     (89      (562      (24

Depreciation and amortization expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

     2,512        5,976        7,742  

Stock-based compensation expense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

     376        1,522        3,101  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

   $  2,524      $  (3,351    $ 5  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(3)  Adjusted gross margin represents gross profit plus stock-based compensation and amortization expenses related to acquisitions. Adjusted gross margin is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans. The exclusion of stock-based compensation expense and amortization expenses related to acquisitions facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis. Adjusted gross margin is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. We believe that adjusted gross margin provides useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our operating results in the same manner as our management and board of directors. Nevertheless, our use of adjusted gross margin has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our financial results as reported under GAAP. You should consider adjusted gross margin alongside our other GAAP-based financial performance measures, gross profit and our other GAAP financial results. The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted gross margin to gross profit, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, for each of the periods indicated.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Gross profit

   $  30,332      $  38,931      $  53,079  

Stock-based compensation expense

     82        150        180  

Amortization expense related to acquisitions

     249        2,003        2,318  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Adjusted gross margin

   $ 30,663      $ 41,084      $ 55,577  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 



 

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(4)  Free cash flow represents net cash provided by operating activities minus capital expenditures and capitalized software development costs. Free cash flow is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans. The exclusion of capital expenditures and amounts capitalized for internally-developed software facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis and excludes items that we do not consider to be indicative of our core operating performance. Free cash flow is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. We believe that free cash flow provides useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our operating results in the same manner as our management and board of directors. Nevertheless, our use of free cash flow has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our financial results as reported under GAAP. You should consider free cash flow alongside our other GAAP-based financial performance measures, net cash provided by operating activities, and our other GAAP financial results. The following table presents a reconciliation of free cash flow to net cash for operating activities, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, for each of the periods indicated.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2014      2015      2016  
     (in thousands)  

Net cash provided by operating activities

   $ 7,716      $ 4,451      $ 9,503  

Capital expenditures

     (2,155      (2,502      (970

Capitalized software development costs

     (1,677      (4,902      (5,494
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Free cash flow

   $ 3,884      $ (2,953    $ 3,039  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 



 

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RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. You should consider carefully the risks and uncertainties described below, together with all of the other information in this prospectus, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes, before deciding whether to purchase shares of our common stock. If any of the following risks is realized, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the price of our common stock could decline, and you could lose part or all of your investment.

Risks Related to Our Business and Our Industry

If our business does not grow as we expect, or if we fail to manage our growth effectively, our operating results and business prospects would suffer.

We increased our number of full-time employees from 303 to 418 to 467 as of December 31, 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. In 2016, we made a significant investment in our sales organization, growing our headcount by 16%, and our revenue increased by $18.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 compared to 2015, due in part to the increase in our customer base.

However, our business may not continue to grow as quickly or at all in the future, which would adversely affect our revenue and business prospects. Our business growth depends on a number of factors including:

 

    our ability to execute upon our business plan effectively;

 

    our ability to accelerate our acquisition of new customers;

 

    our ability to further sell to our existing customers new applications and features and to additional departments in their organizations;

 

    our ability to develop new applications to target new markets and use cases;

 

    our ability to expand our international footprint;

 

    the growth of the market in which we operate;

 

    our ability to maintain our technology leadership position; and

 

    our ability to acquire complementary business, technologies and teams we need.

Further, our growth has placed, and will continue to place, a strain on our managerial, operational, financial and other resources, and our future operating results depend to a large extent on our ability to successfully manage our anticipated expansion and growth. To manage our growth successfully and handle the responsibilities of being a public company, we believe we must effectively, among other things:

 

    increase our customer base and upsell and cross-sell additional and new applications to our existing customers;

 

    invest in sales and marketing and expand our channel partner relationships;

 

    develop new applications that target new markets and use cases;

 

    expand our international operations; and

 

    improve our platform and applications, financial and operational systems, procedures and controls.

We intend to continue our investment in sales and marketing, platform and applications, research and development, and general and administrative functions and other areas to grow our business. We are likely to

 

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recognize the costs associated with these investments earlier than some of the anticipated benefits and the return on these investments may be lower, or may develop more slowly, than we expect, which could adversely affect our operating results.

If we are unable to manage our growth effectively in a manner that preserves the key aspects of our corporate culture, we may not be able to take advantage of market opportunities or develop new applications or upgrades to our existing applications and we may fail to satisfy customer requirements, maintain the quality and security of our applications, execute on our business plan or respond to competitive pressures, which could result in our financial results suffering and a decline in our stock price.

We have not been profitable on a consistent basis historically and may not achieve or maintain profitability in the future.

We have posted a net loss in each year since inception, including net losses of $0.6 million, $10.8 million and $11.3 million in the years ended December 31, 2014, 2015, 2016, respectively. As of December 31, 2016, we had an accumulated deficit of $89.6 million. While we have experienced significant revenue growth in recent periods and profitability solely in the quarters ended March 31, 2014, June 30, 2014 and September 30, 2014, we are not certain whether or when we will obtain a high enough volume of sales of our applications to sustain or increase our growth or achieve or maintain profitability in the future. We also expect our costs to increase in future periods, which could negatively affect our future operating results if our revenue does not increase. In particular, we expect to continue to expend substantial financial and other resources on:

 

    sales and marketing, including a significant expansion of our sales organization, both domestically and internationally;

 

    research and development related to our platform and applications, including investments in our research and development team;

 

    continued international expansion of our business; and

 

    general and administration expenses, including legal and accounting expenses related to being a public company.

These investments may not result in increased revenue or growth in our business. If we are unable to increase our revenue at a rate sufficient to offset the expected increase in our costs, our business, financial position and results of operations will be harmed, and we may not be able to achieve or maintain profitability over the long term. Additionally, we may encounter unforeseen operating expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown factors that may result in losses in future periods. If our revenue growth does not meet our expectations in future periods, our financial performance may be harmed, and we may not achieve or maintain profitability in the future.

To date, we have derived substantially all of our revenue from the sale of our Mass Notification application. If we are unable to renew or increase sales of this application, or if we are unable to increase sales of our other applications, our business and operating results could be adversely affected.

While we have recently introduced five new critical communications applications, one of which was introduced in the middle of 2014, three of which were introduced in 2015 and one of which was introduced in 2016, we derived 96%, 91% and 86% of our revenue from sales of our Mass Notification application in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively, and expect to continue to derive a substantial portion of our revenue from sales of this application in the near term. As a result, our operating results could suffer due to:

 

    any decline in demand for our Mass Notification application;

 

    pricing or other competitive pressures from competing products;

 

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    the introduction of applications and technologies that serve as a replacement or substitute for, or represent an improvement over, our Mass Notification application;

 

    technological innovations or new standards that our Mass Notification application do not address; and

 

    sensitivity to current or future prices offered by us or competing solutions.

Because of our reliance on our Mass Notification application, our inability to renew or increase sales of this application or a decline in prices of this application would harm our business and operating results more seriously than if we derived significant revenue from a variety of applications. Any factor adversely affecting sales of our historical or new applications, including release cycles, market acceptance, competition, performance and reliability, reputation and economic and market conditions, could adversely affect our business and operating results.

If we are unable to develop upgrades to our platform, develop new applications, sell our platform and applications into new markets or further penetrate our existing market, our revenue may not grow.

Our ability to increase sales will depend in large part on our ability to enhance and improve our platform and applications, introduce new applications in a timely manner, develop new use cases for our platform and further penetrate our existing market. The success of any enhancement to our platform or new applications depends on several factors, including the timely completion, introduction and market acceptance of enhanced or new applications, the ability to maintain and develop relationships with channel partners and communications carriers, the ability to attract, retain and effectively train sales and marketing personnel and the effectiveness of our marketing programs. Any new application that we develop or acquire may not be introduced in a timely or cost-effective manner, and may not achieve the broad market acceptance necessary to generate significant revenue. Any new markets into which we attempt to sell our applications, including new vertical markets and new countries or regions, may not be receptive. Our ability to further penetrate our existing markets depends on the quality of our platform and applications and our ability to design our platform and applications to meet consumer demand. Any failure to enhance or improve our platform and applications as well as introduce new applications may adversely affect our revenue growth and operating results.

If we are unable to attract new customers or sell additional applications to our existing customers, our revenue and revenue growth will be harmed.

A part of our growth strategy is to add new customers and sell additional applications to our existing customers. Our ability to maintain existing customers, sell them new applications and to add new customers will depend in significant part on our ability to anticipate industry evolution, practices and standards and to continue to introduce and enhance the applications we offer on a timely basis to keep pace with technological developments. However, we may prove unsuccessful in developing new applications and improving existing applications. In addition, the success of any new application depends on several factors, including the timely completion, introduction and market acceptance of the application. Any new applications we develop or acquire might not be introduced in a timely or cost-effective manner and might not achieve the broad market acceptance necessary to generate significant revenue. If any of our competitors implements new technologies before we are able to implement them or better anticipates market opportunities, those competitors may be able to provide more effective or cheaper products than ours. As a result, we may be unable to renew our agreements with existing customers, attract new customers or grow or maintain our business from existing customers, which could harm our revenue and growth.

Failure to effectively develop and expand our sales and marketing capabilities could harm our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform and applications.

To increase total customers and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform and applications, we will need to expand our sales and marketing organization, including the vertical and geographic distribution of our salesforce and our teams of account executives focused on new accounts, account managers responsible for

 

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renewal and growth of existing accounts, and business development representatives targeting new and growth business opportunity creation. We will continue to dedicate significant resources to our global sales and marketing organizations. The effectiveness of our sales and marketing teams has varied over time and may vary in the future, and depends in part on our ability to maintain and improve our platform and applications. All of these efforts will require us to invest significant financial and other resources and we are unlikely to see the benefits, if any, of these increases until future periods after incurring these expenses. Our business will be seriously harmed if our efforts do not generate a correspondingly significant increase in revenue. We may not achieve revenue growth from expanding our salesforce if we are unable to hire, develop and retain talented sales personnel, if our new sales personnel are unable to achieve desired productivity levels in a reasonable period of time or if our sales and marketing programs are not effective.

The nature of our business exposes us to inherent liability risks.

Our applications, including our Mass Notification, Incident Management, IT Alerting, Safety Connection, Community Engagement, Visual Command Center, Crisis Commander and Secure Messaging applications, are designed to communicate life-saving or damage-mitigating information to the right people, on the right device, in the right location, at the right time during public safety threats and critical business events. Due to the nature of such applications, we are potentially exposed to greater risks of liability for employee acts or omissions or system failures than may be inherent in other businesses. Although substantially all of our customer agreements contain provisions limiting our liability to our customers, we cannot assure you that these limitations will be enforced or the costs of any litigation related to actual or alleged omissions or failures would have a material adverse effect on us even if we prevail. Further, certain of our insurance policies and the laws of some states may limit or prohibit insurance coverage for punitive or certain other types of damages or liability arising from gross negligence and we cannot assure you that we are adequately insured against the risks that we face.

Because we generally recognize revenue ratably over the term of our contract with a customer, downturns or upturns in sales will not be fully reflected in our operating results until future periods.

Our revenue is primarily generated from subscriptions to our critical communications applications. Our customers do not have the right to take possession of our software platform and applications. Revenue from subscriptions, including additional fees for items such as incremental usage, is recognized ratably over the subscription period beginning on the date that the subscription is made available to the customer. Our agreements with our customers typically range from one to three years. As a result, much of the revenue that we report in each quarter is attributable to agreements entered into during previous quarters. Consequently, a decline in sales, customer renewals or market acceptance of our applications in any one quarter would not necessarily be fully reflected in the revenue in that quarter, and would negatively affect our revenue and profitability in future quarters. This ratable revenue recognition also makes it difficult for us to rapidly increase our revenue through additional sales in any period, as revenue from new customers generally is recognized over the applicable agreement term.

We operate in an emerging and evolving market, which may develop more slowly or differently than we expect. If our market does not grow as we expect, or if we cannot expand our platform and applications to meet the demands of this market, our revenue may decline, fail to grow or fail to grow at an accelerated rate, and we may incur operating losses.

The market for CEM solutions is in an early stage of development, and it is uncertain whether this market will develop, and even if it does develop, how rapidly or how consistently it will develop or whether our platform and applications will be accepted into the markets in which we operate and plan to operate. Our success will depend, to a substantial extent, on the widespread adoption of our platform and applications as an alternative to historical mass notification systems. Some organizations may be reluctant or unwilling to use our platform and applications for a number of reasons, including concerns about additional costs, uncertainty regarding the reliability and security of cloud-based offerings or lack of awareness of the benefits of our platform and applications. Many organizations have invested substantial personnel and financial resources to integrate traditional on-premise

 

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applications into their businesses, and therefore may be reluctant or unwilling to migrate to cloud-based applications. Our ability to expand sales of our platform and applications into new markets depends on several factors, including the awareness of our platform and applications; the timely completion, introduction and market acceptance of enhancements to our platform and applications or new applications that we may introduce; our ability to attract, retain and effectively train sales and marketing personnel; our ability to develop relationships with channel partners and communication carriers; the effectiveness of our marketing programs; the costs of our platform and applications; and the success of our competitors. If we are unsuccessful in developing and marketing our platform and applications into new markets, or if organizations do not perceive or value the benefits of our platform and applications, the market for our platform and applications might not continue to develop or might develop more slowly than we expect, either of which would harm our revenue and growth prospects.

Our estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

Market opportunity estimates and growth forecasts are subject to significant uncertainty and are based on assumptions and estimates that may not prove to be accurate. Our estimates and forecasts relating to the size and expected growth of our addressable market may prove to be inaccurate. Even if the market in which we compete meets our size estimates and forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

The markets in which we participate are competitive, and if we do not compete effectively, our operating results could be harmed.

The market for critical communications solutions is highly fragmented, competitive and constantly evolving. With the introduction of new technologies and market entrants, we expect that the competitive environment in which we compete will remain intense going forward. Some of our competitors have made or may make acquisitions or may enter into partnerships or other strategic relationships to provide a more comprehensive offering than they individually had offered or achieve greater economies of scale. In addition, new entrants not currently considered to be competitors may enter the market through acquisitions, partnerships or strategic relationships. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including:

 

    application functionality, including local and multi-modal delivery in international markets;

 

    breadth of offerings;

 

    performance, security, scalability and reliability;

 

    compliance with local regulations and multi-language support;

 

    brand recognition, reputation and customer satisfaction;

 

    ease of application implementation, use and maintenance; and

 

    total cost of ownership.

We face competition from in-house solutions, large integrated systems vendors and established and emerging cloud and SaaS and other software providers. Our competitors vary in size and in the breadth and scope of the products and services offered. Many of our competitors and potential competitors have greater name recognition, longer operating histories, more established customer relationships, larger marketing budgets and greater resources than we do. While some of our competitors provide a platform with applications to support one or more use cases, many others provide point-solutions that address a single use case. Further, other potential competitors not currently offering competitive applications may expand their offerings to compete with our solutions. Our competitors may be able to respond more quickly and effectively than we can to new or changing opportunities, technologies, standards and customer requirements. An existing competitor or new entrant could

 

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introduce new technology that reduces demand for our solutions. In addition to application and technology competition, we face pricing competition. Some of our competitors offer their applications or services at a lower price, which has resulted in pricing pressures. Some of our larger competitors have the operating flexibility to bundle competing applications and services with other offerings, including offering them at a lower price as part of a larger sale. For all of these reasons, we may not be able to compete successfully and competition could result in reduced sales, reduced margins, losses or the failure of our applications to achieve or maintain market acceptance, any of which could harm our business.

We may not be able to scale our business quickly enough to meet our customers’ growing needs and if we are not able to grow efficiently, our operating results could be harmed.

As usage of our platform and applications grows, we will need to continue making significant investments to develop and implement new applications, technologies, security features and cloud-based infrastructure operations. In addition, we will need to appropriately scale our internal business systems and our services organization, including customer support and professional services, to serve our growing customer base, particularly as our customer demographics change over time. Any failure of, or delay in, these efforts could impair the performance of our platform and applications and reduce customer satisfaction. Even if we are able to upgrade our systems and expand our staff, any such expansion may be expensive and complex, requiring management’s time and attention. To the extent that we do not effectively scale our platform and operations to meet the growing needs of our customers, we may not be able to grow as quickly as we anticipate, our customers may reduce or cancel use of our applications and professional services, we may be unable to compete effectively and our business and operating results may be harmed.

Our quarterly results of operations may fluctuate, and if we fail to meet or exceed the expectations of investors or securities analysts, our stock price could decline.

Our quarterly revenue and results of operations have historically varied from period to period, and we expect that they will continue to do so as a result of a variety of factors, including many that are outside of our control. Our future revenue is difficult to predict. Our expense levels are relatively fixed in the short term and are based, in part, on our expectations as to future revenue. If revenue levels are below our expectations, we may incur higher losses and may never attain or maintain consistent profitability. Our operating results may be disproportionately affected by a reduction in revenue because a proportionately smaller amount of our expenses varies with our revenues. If our quarterly revenue or results of operations fall below the expectations of investors or securities analysts, the price of our common stock could decline substantially. Fluctuations in our results of operations may be due to a number of factors, including:

 

    fluctuations in demand for our platform and applications;

 

    changes in our business or pricing policies in response to competitive pricing actions or otherwise;

 

    the timing and success of introductions of new applications or upgrades to our platform;

 

    the impact of acquisition transaction-related amortization expenses and other certain expenses on our gross profit;

 

    competition, including entry into the industry by new competitors and new offerings by existing competitors;

 

    changes in the business or pricing policies of our competitors;

 

    the amount and timing of expenditures, including those related to expanding our operations, increasing research and development, enhancing our platform, introducing new applications or growing our sales and marketing teams;

 

    our ability to effectively manage growth within existing and new markets, both domestically and internationally;

 

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    changes in the payment terms for our applications;

 

    our ability to successfully manage any future acquisitions of businesses or technologies;

 

    the strength of regional, national and global economies; and

 

    the impact of natural disasters or man-made problems such as cyber incidents and terrorism.

Due to the foregoing factors and the other risks discussed in this prospectus, you should not rely on quarter-to-quarter comparisons of our results of operations as an indication of our future performance nor should you consider our recent revenue growth or results in any single period to be indicative of our future performance.

Interruptions or delays in service from our third-party data center providers could impair our ability to make our platform and applications available to our customers, resulting in customer dissatisfaction, damage to our reputation, loss of customers, limited growth and reduction in revenue.

We currently serve part of our platform functions from third-party data center hosting facilities operated by Century Link and located in the Los Angeles, California and Denver, Colorado areas. In addition, we serve ancillary functions for our customers from third-party data center hosting facilities operated by Interoute located in the United Kingdom, Germany and the Netherlands, and by Elastichost in Toronto, Canada. We also rely on Amazon Web Services located in California and Virginia to host certain of our platform functions and applications. Our operations depend, in part, on our third-party facility providers’ abilities to protect these facilities against damage or interruption from natural disasters, power or telecommunications failures, cyber incidents, criminal acts and similar events. In the event that any of our third-party facilities arrangements are terminated, or if there is a lapse of service or damage to a facility, we could experience interruptions in our platform as well as delays and additional expenses in arranging new facilities and services. Any changes in third-party service levels at our data centers or any errors, defects, disruptions, cyber incidents or other performance problems with our solutions could harm our reputation.

Any damage to, or failure of, the systems of our third-party providers could result in interruptions to our platform. Despite precautions taken at our data centers, the occurrence of spikes in usage volume, natural disasters, cyber incidents, acts of terrorism, vandalism or sabotage, closure of a facility without adequate notice or other unanticipated problems could result in lengthy interruptions in the availability of our platform and applications. Problems faced by our third-party data center locations, with the telecommunications network providers with whom they contract, or with the systems by which our telecommunications providers allocate capacity among their customers, including us, could adversely affect the experience of our customers. Because of the nature of the services that we provide to our customers during public safety threats and critical business events, any such interruption may arise when our customers are most reliant on our applications, thereby compounding the impact of any interruption on our business. Interruptions in our services might reduce our revenue, cause us to issue refunds to customers and subject us to potential liability.

Further, our insurance policies may not adequately compensate us for any losses that we may incur in the event of damage or interruption. Although we benefit from liability protection under the Support Anti-Terrorism by Fostering Effective Technology Act of 2002, the occurrence of any of the foregoing could reduce our revenue, subject us to liability, cause us to issue credits to customers or cause customers not to renew their subscriptions for our applications, any of which could materially adversely affect our business.

Failures or reduced accessibility of third-party software on which we rely could impair the availability of our platform and applications and adversely affect our business.

We license software from third parties for integration into our platform and applications, including open source software. These licenses might not continue to be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. While we are not substantially dependent upon any third-party software, the loss of the right to use all or a significant portion of our third-party software required for the development, maintenance and delivery of our applications could result

 

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in delays in the provision of our applications until we develop or identify, obtain and integrate equivalent technology, which could harm our business.

Any errors or defects in the hardware or software we use could result in errors, interruptions, cyber incidents or a failure of our applications. Any significant interruption in the availability of all or a significant portion of such software could have an adverse impact on our business unless and until we can replace the functionality provided by these applications at a similar cost. Furthermore, this software may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. The loss of the right to use all or a significant portion of this software could limit access to our platform and applications. Additionally, we rely upon third parties’ abilities to enhance their current applications, develop new applications on a timely and cost-effective basis and respond to emerging industry standards and other technological changes. We may be unable to effect changes to such third-party technologies, which may prevent us from rapidly responding to evolving customer requirements. We also may be unable to replace the functionality provided by the third-party software currently offered in conjunction with our applications in the event that such software becomes obsolete or incompatible with future versions of our platform and applications or is otherwise not adequately maintained or updated.

If we do not or cannot maintain the compatibility of our platform with third-party applications that our customers use in their businesses, our revenue will decline.

As a significant percentage of our customers choose to integrate our solutions with certain capabilities provided by third-party providers, the functionality and popularity of our solutions depend, in part, on our ability to integrate our platform and applications with certain third-party systems. Third-party providers may change the features of their technologies, restrict our access to their applications or alter the terms governing use of their applications in an adverse manner. Such changes could functionally limit or terminate our ability to use these third-party technologies in conjunction with our platform and applications, which could negatively impact our solutions and harm our business. If we fail to integrate our solutions with new third-party applications that our customers use, we may not be able to offer the functionality that our customers need, which would negatively impact our ability to generate revenue and adversely impact our business.

Changes in the mix of sizes or types of businesses or government agencies that purchase our platform and applications purchased or used by our customers could affect our operating results.

We have sold and will continue to sell to enterprises of all sizes, municipal and regional governmental agencies, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and healthcare organizations. Sales to larger organizations may entail longer sales cycles and more significant selling efforts. Selling to small businesses may involve greater credit risk and uncertainty. Changes in the sizes or types of businesses that purchase our applications could cause our operating results to be adversely affected.

If our, our customers’ or our third-party providers’ security measures are compromised or unauthorized access to the data of our customers or their employees, customers or constituents is otherwise obtained, our platform may be perceived as not being secure, our customers may be harmed and may curtail or cease their use of our applications, our reputation may be damaged and we may incur significant liabilities.

Our operations involve the storage and transmission of data of our customers and their employees, customers and constituents, including personally identifiable information such as contact information and physical location. Security incidents, whether as a result of third-party action, employee or customer error, technology impairment or failure, malfeasance or criminal activity, could result in unauthorized access to, or loss or unauthorized disclosure of, this information, litigation, indemnity obligations and other possible liabilities, as well as negative publicity, which could damage our reputation, impair our sales and harm our customers and our business. Cyber incidents and malicious internet-based activity continue to increase generally, and providers of cloud-based services have been targeted. If third parties with whom we work, such as vendors or developers, violate applicable laws or our security policies, such violations may also put our customers’ information at risk and could in turn have an adverse effect on our business. We may be unable to anticipate or prevent techniques used

 

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to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems because they change frequently and often are not detected until after an incident has occurred. As we increase our customer base and our brand becomes more widely known and recognized, third parties may increasingly seek to compromise our security controls or gain unauthorized access to our sensitive corporate information or customers’ data. Further, because of the nature of the services that we provide to our customers during public safety threats and critical business events, we may be a unique target for attacks.

Many governments have enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security incidents or unauthorized transfers involving certain types of personal data. In addition, some of our customers contractually require notification of any data security incident. Accordingly, security incidents experienced by our competitors, by our customers or by us may lead to public disclosures, which may lead to widespread negative publicity. Any security compromise in our industry, whether actual or perceived, could harm our reputation, erode customer confidence in the effectiveness of our security measures, negatively impact our ability to attract new customers, cause existing customers to elect not to renew their subscriptions or subject us to third-party lawsuits, regulatory fines or other action or liability, which could materially and adversely affect our business and operating results. Further, the costs of compliance with notification laws and contractual obligations may be significant and any requirement that we provide such notifications as a result of an actual or alleged compromise could have a material and adverse effect on our business.

While we maintain general liability insurance coverage and coverage for errors or omissions, we cannot assure you that such coverage would be adequate or would otherwise protect us from liabilities or damages with respect to claims alleging compromises of personal data or that such coverage will continue to be available on acceptable terms or at all.

If our applications fail to function in a manner that allows our customers to operate in compliance with regulations and/or industry standards, our revenue and operating results could be harmed.

Certain of our customers require applications that ensure secure communications given the nature of the content being distributed and associated applicable regulatory requirements. In particular, our healthcare customers rely on our applications to communicate in a manner that is designed to comply with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, the 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, the Final Omnibus Rule of January 25, 2013, which are collectively referred to as HIPAA, and which impose privacy and data security standards that protect individually identifiable health information by limiting the uses and disclosures of individually identifiable health information and requiring that certain data security standards be implemented to protect this information. As a “business associate” to “covered entities” that are subject to HIPAA, we also have our own compliance obligations directly under HIPAA and pursuant to the business associate agreements that we are required to enter into with our customers that are HIPAA-covered entities.

Governments and industry organizations may also adopt new laws, regulations or requirements, or make changes to existing laws or regulations, that could impact the demand for, or value of, our applications. If we are unable to adapt our applications to changing legal and regulatory standards or other requirements in a timely manner, or if our applications fail to allow our customers to communicate in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, our customers may lose confidence in our applications and could switch to products offered by our competitors, or threaten or bring legal actions against us.

In addition, governmental and other customers may require our applications to comply with certain privacy, security or other certifications and standards. For instance, with regard to transfers of personal data, the EU-US Safe Harbor program, which provided a valid legal basis for transfers of personal data from Europe to the United States, was invalidated in October 2015, which has a significant impact on the transfer of data from the European Union to U.S. companies, including us. We are certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield, the successor regime to the EU-US Safe Harbor. While we now have Privacy Shield certification and other legally recognized mechanisms in place that we believe allow for the lawful transfer of EU customer and employee

 

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information to the United States, it is possible that these mechanisms may also be challenged or evolve to include new legal requirements that could have an impact on how we move this data. If our applications fail to maintain compliance with these certifications and standards, or our competitors achieve compliance with these certifications and standards, we may be disqualified from selling our applications to such customers, or may otherwise be at a competitive disadvantage, either of which would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition. If our policies and practices are, or are perceived to be, insufficient or if our customers have concerns regarding the transfer of data from the European Union to the United States, we could be subject to enforcement actions or investigations by EU Data Protection Authorities or lawsuits by private parties, and our business could be negatively impacted.

If we fail to offer high-quality customer support, our business and reputation may suffer.

We offer our customers implementation services and 24/7 support through our customer support centers as well as education, professional development and certification through Everbridge University as well as a range of consulting services. Consulting service offerings include onsite implementation packages, Certified Emergency Management professional operational reviews, dedicated client care representatives, custom web-based training, and development of client-specific communications materials to increase internal awareness of system value.

Providing this education, training and support requires that our personnel who manage our training resources or provide customer support have specific experience, knowledge and expertise, making it more difficult for us to hire qualified personnel and to scale up our support operations. The importance of high-quality customer support will increase as we expand our business and pursue new customers and larger organizations. We may be unable to respond quickly enough to accommodate short-term increases in customer demand for support services or scale our services if our business grows. We also may be unable to modify the format of our support services or change our pricing to compete with changes in support services provided by our competitors. Increased customer demand for these services, without corresponding revenue, could increase our costs and harm our operating results. If we do not help our customers use applications within our platform and provide effective ongoing support, our ability to sell additional applications to, or to retain, existing customers may suffer and our reputation with existing or potential customers may be harmed.

Our strategy includes pursuing acquisitions, and our potential inability to successfully integrate newly-acquired technologies, assets or businesses may harm our financial results. Future acquisitions of technologies, assets or businesses, which are paid for partially or entirely through the issuance of stock or stock rights, could dilute the ownership of our existing stockholders.

We may evaluate and consider potential strategic transactions, including acquisitions of, or investments in, businesses, technologies, services, products and other assets in the future. We also may enter into relationships with other businesses to expand our platform and applications, which could involve preferred or exclusive licenses, additional channels of distribution, discount pricing or investments in other companies.

We have acquired businesses and technology in the past. For example, we acquired Vocal Limited in March 2014, the assets of Nixle, LLC in December 2014, technology from Tapestry Telemed LLC in December 2014, Svensk Krisledning AB in December 2016 and IDV Solutions LLC in January 2017. We believe that part of our continued growth will be driven by acquisitions of other companies or their technologies, assets, businesses and teams. Any acquisitions we complete will give rise to risks, including:

 

    incurring higher than anticipated capital expenditures and operating expenses;

 

    failing to assimilate the operations and personnel or failing to retain the key personnel of the acquired company or business;

 

    failing to integrate the acquired technologies, or incurring significant expense to integrate acquired technologies, into our platform and applications;

 

    disrupting our ongoing business;

 

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    diverting our management’s attention and other company resources;

 

    failing to maintain uniform standards, controls and policies;

 

    incurring significant accounting charges;

 

    impairing relationships with our customers and employees;

 

    finding that the acquired technology, asset or business does not further our business strategy, that we overpaid for the technology, asset or business or that we may be required to write off acquired assets or investments partially or entirely;

 

    failing to realize the expected synergies of the transaction;

 

    being exposed to unforeseen liabilities and contingencies that were not identified prior to acquiring the company; and

 

    being unable to generate sufficient revenue and profits from acquisitions to offset the associated acquisition costs.

Fully integrating an acquired technology, asset or business into our operations may take a significant amount of time. We may not be successful in overcoming these risks or any other problems encountered with acquisitions. To the extent that we do not successfully avoid or overcome the risks or problems related to any such acquisitions, our results of operations and financial condition could be harmed. Acquisitions also could impact our financial position and capital requirements, or could cause fluctuations in our quarterly and annual results of operations. Acquisitions could include significant goodwill and intangible assets, which may result in future impairment charges that would reduce our stated earnings. We may incur significant costs in our efforts to engage in strategic transactions and these expenditures may not result in successful acquisitions.

We expect that the consideration we might pay for any future acquisitions of technologies, assets, businesses or teams could include stock, rights to purchase stock, cash or some combination of the foregoing. If we issue stock or rights to purchase stock in connection with future acquisitions, net income per share and then-existing holders of our common stock may experience dilution.

We rely on the performance of our senior management and highly skilled personnel, and if we are unable to attract, retain and motivate well-qualified employees, our business and results of operations could be harmed.

We believe our success has depended, and continues to depend, on the efforts and talents of senior management and key personnel, including Jaime Ellertson, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of our board of directors, Kenneth S. Goldman, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, and Imad Mouline, our Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer. Our future success depends on our continuing ability to attract, develop, motivate and retain highly qualified and skilled employees. Qualified individuals are in high demand, and we may incur significant costs to attract them. In addition, the loss of any of our senior management or key personnel could interrupt our ability to execute our business plan, as such individuals may be difficult to replace. If we do not succeed in attracting well-qualified employees or retaining and motivating existing employees, our business and results of operations could be harmed.

Uncertain or weakened global economic conditions may adversely affect our industry, business and results of operations.

Our overall performance depends on domestic and worldwide economic conditions, which may remain challenging for the foreseeable future. Financial developments seemingly unrelated to us or to our industry may adversely affect us and our planned international expansion. The U.S. economy and other key international economies have been impacted by threatened sovereign defaults and ratings downgrades, falling demand for a variety of goods and services, restricted credit, threats to major multinational companies, poor liquidity, reduced

 

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corporate profitability, volatility in credit, equity and foreign exchange markets, bankruptcies and overall uncertainty. These conditions affect the rate of information technology spending and could adversely affect our customers’ ability or willingness to purchase our applications and services, delay prospective customers’ purchasing decisions, reduce the value or duration of their subscriptions or affect renewal rates, any of which could adversely affect our operating results. We cannot predict the timing, strength or duration of the economic recovery or any subsequent economic slowdown worldwide, in the United States, or in our industry.

Any future litigation against us could be costly and time-consuming to defend.

We have in the past and may in the future become subject, from time to time, to legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business such as claims brought by our customers in connection with commercial disputes or employment claims made by our current or former employees. Litigation might result in substantial costs and may divert management’s attention and resources, which might seriously harm our business, overall financial condition and operating results. Insurance might not cover such claims, might not provide sufficient payments to cover all the costs to resolve one or more such claims and might not continue to be available on terms acceptable to us. A claim brought against us that is uninsured or underinsured could result in unanticipated costs, thereby reducing our operating results and leading analysts or potential investors to reduce their expectations of our performance, which could reduce the trading price of our stock.

Because our long-term growth strategy involves further expansion of our sales to customers outside the United States, our business will be susceptible to risks associated with international operations.

A component of our growth strategy involves the further expansion of our operations and customer base internationally. We opened our first international office in Beijing, China in April 2012 and subsequently opened an office in Windsor, United Kingdom in September 2012 as part of our geographic expansion. In March 2014, we acquired Vocal Limited, a mass notification company based in Colchester, United Kingdom. In December 2016, we acquired Svensk Krisledning AB, a SaaS mobile crisis management company based in Norsburg, Sweden. For the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2016, approximately 14% and 10% of our revenue was derived from customers located outside of the United States. We intend to further expand our local presence in regions such as Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Our current international operations and future initiatives will involve a variety of risks, including:

 

    currency exchange rate fluctuations and the resulting effect on our revenue and expenses, and the cost and risk of entering into hedging transactions if we chose to do so in the future;

 

    economic or political instability in foreign markets;

 

    greater difficulty in enforcing contracts, accounts receivable collection and longer collection periods;

 

    more stringent regulations relating to technology, including with respect to privacy, data security and the unauthorized use of, access to, or deletion of commercial and personal information, particularly in the European Union;

 

    difficulties in maintaining our company culture with a dispersed and distant workforce;

 

    unexpected changes in regulatory requirements, taxes or trade laws;

 

    differing labor regulations, especially in the European Union, where labor laws are generally more advantageous to employees as compared to the United States, including deemed hourly wage and overtime regulations in these locations;

 

    challenges inherent in efficiently managing an increased number of employees over large geographic distances, including the need to implement appropriate systems, policies, benefits and compliance programs;

 

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    difficulties in managing a business in new markets with diverse cultures, languages, customs, legal systems, alternative dispute systems and regulatory systems;

 

    limitations on our ability to reinvest earnings from operations in one country to fund the capital needs of our operations in other countries;

 

    limited or insufficient intellectual property protection;

 

    political instability or terrorist activities;

 

    likelihood of potential or actual violations of domestic and international anticorruption laws, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the U.K. Bribery Act, or of U.S. and international export control and sanctions regulations, which likelihood may increase with an increase of sales or operations in foreign jurisdictions and operations in certain industries; and

 

    adverse tax burdens and foreign exchange controls that could make it difficult to repatriate earnings and cash.

Our limited experience in operating our business internationally increases the risk that any potential future expansion efforts that we may undertake will not be successful. If we invest substantial time and resources to expand our international operations and are unable to do so successfully and in a timely manner, our business and operating results will suffer. We continue to implement policies and procedures to facilitate our compliance with U.S. laws and regulations applicable to or arising from our international business. Inadequacies in our past or current compliance practices may increase the risk of inadvertent violations of such laws and regulations, which could lead to financial and other penalties that could damage our reputation and impose costs on us.

If we cannot maintain our company culture as we grow, our success and our business may be harmed.

We believe our culture has been a key contributor to our success to-date and that the critical nature of the solutions that we provide promotes a sense of greater purpose and fulfillment in our employees. We have invested in building a strong corporate culture and believe it is one of our most important and sustainable sources of competitive advantage. Any failure to preserve our culture could negatively affect our ability to retain and recruit personnel and to effectively focus on and pursue our corporate objectives. As we grow and develop the infrastructure of a public company, we may find it difficult to maintain these important aspects of our company culture. If we fail to maintain our company culture, our business may be adversely impacted.

We may be subject to additional obligations to collect and remit sales tax and other taxes, and we may be subject to tax liability for past sales, which could harm our business.

State, local and foreign jurisdictions have differing rules and regulations governing sales, use, value added and other taxes, and these rules and regulations are subject to varying interpretations that may change over time. Further, these jurisdictions’ rules regarding tax nexus are complex and vary significantly. If one or more jurisdictions were to assert that we have failed to collect taxes for sales of applications that leverage our platform, we could face the possibility of tax assessments and audits. A successful assertion that we should be collecting additional sales, use, value added or other taxes in those jurisdictions where we have not historically done so and do not accrue for such taxes could result in substantial tax liabilities and related penalties for past sales or otherwise harm our business and operating results.

We face exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations.

As our international operations expand, our exposure to the effects of fluctuations in currency exchange rates grows. While we have primarily transacted with customers and vendors in U.S. dollars historically, we expect to continue to expand the number of transactions with our customers that are denominated in foreign currencies in the future. Fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies may make our subscriptions more expensive for international customers, which could harm our business. Additionally, we incur expenses for

 

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employee compensation and other operating expenses at our non-U.S. locations in the local currency for such locations. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and other currencies could result in an increase to the U.S. dollar equivalent of such expenses. These fluctuations could cause our results of operations to differ from our expectations or the expectations of our investors. Additionally, such foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations could make it more difficult to detect underlying trends in our business and results of operations.

We do not currently maintain a program to hedge transactional exposures in foreign currencies. However, in the future, we may use derivative instruments, such as foreign currency forward and option contracts, to hedge certain exposures to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The use of such hedging activities may not offset any or more than a portion of the adverse financial effects of unfavorable movements in foreign exchange rates over the limited time the hedges are in place. Moreover, the use of hedging instruments may introduce additional risks if we are unable to structure effective hedges with such instruments.

Our ability to raise capital in the future may be limited, and our failure to raise capital when needed could prevent us from growing.

Our business and operations may consume resources faster than we anticipate. In the future, we may need to raise additional funds to invest in future growth opportunities. Additional financing may not be available on favorable terms, if at all. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to invest in future growth opportunities, which could seriously harm our business and operating results. If we incur debt, the debt holders would have rights senior to common stockholders to make claims on our assets, and the terms of any debt could restrict our operations, including our ability to pay dividends on our common stock. Furthermore, if we issue equity securities, stockholders will experience dilution, and the new equity securities could have rights senior to those of our common stock. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings. As a result, our stockholders bear the risk of our future securities offerings reducing the market price of our common stock and diluting their interest.

Our sales cycle can be unpredictable, time-consuming and costly, which could harm our business and operating results.

Our sales process involves educating prospective customers and existing customers about the use, technical capabilities and benefits of our platform and applications. Prospective customers, especially larger organizations, often undertake a prolonged evaluation process, which typically involves not only our solutions, but also those of our competitors and lasts from four to nine months or longer. We may spend substantial time, effort and money on our sales and marketing efforts without any assurance that our efforts will produce any sales.

Events affecting our customers’ businesses may occur during the sales cycle that could affect the size or timing of a purchase, contributing to more unpredictability in our business and operating results. As a result of these factors, we may face greater costs, longer sales cycles and less predictability in the future.

Our ability to use our net operating losses to offset future taxable income may be subject to certain limitations.

As of December 31, 2016, we had federal and state net operating loss carryforwards, or NOLs, of $46.2 million and $40.5 million, respectively, due to prior period losses, which expire in various years beginning in 2028 if not utilized. In general, under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, a corporation that undergoes an “ownership change” is subject to limitations on its ability to utilize its NOLs to offset future taxable income. Our existing NOLs may be subject to limitations arising from previous ownership changes. Future changes in our stock ownership, some of which are outside of our control, could result in an ownership change. There is also a risk that due to regulatory changes, such as suspensions on the use of NOLs, or other unforeseen reasons, our existing NOLs could expire or otherwise be unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities. Additionally, state NOLs generated in one state cannot be used to offset income generated in another state. For these reasons, we may not be able to realize a tax benefit from the use of our NOLs, whether or not we attain profitability.

 

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Our business is subject to the risks of earthquakes, fires, floods and other natural catastrophic events and to interruption by man-made problems such as cyber incidents or terrorism.

Our business and operations are vulnerable to damage or interruption from earthquakes, fires, floods, power losses, telecommunications failures, terrorist attacks, acts of war, human errors, break-ins and similar events affecting us or third-party vendors we rely on, any of which could have a material adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. Acts of terrorism, which may be targeted at metropolitan areas that have higher population density than rural areas, could cause disruptions in our or our customers’ businesses or the economy as a whole. Our servers and those of our third-party vendors may also be vulnerable to cyber incidents, break-ins and similar disruptions from unauthorized tampering with our computer systems, which could lead to interruptions, delays, loss of critical data or the unauthorized disclosure of confidential customer data. We or our customers may not have sufficient protection or recovery plans in place, and our business interruption insurance may be insufficient to compensate us for losses that may occur. As we rely heavily on our servers, computer and communications systems, that of third parties and the Internet to conduct our business and provide high quality customer service, such disruptions could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

Our reported financial results may be adversely affected by changes in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

Generally accepted accounting principles in the United States are subject to interpretation by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, the SEC and various bodies formed to promulgate and interpret appropriate accounting principles. A change in these principles or interpretations could have a significant effect on our reported financial results, and could affect the reporting of transactions completed before the announcement of a change.

Impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets would result in a decrease in our earnings.

Current accounting rules provide that goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite useful lives may not be amortized but instead must be tested for impairment at least annually. These rules also require that intangible assets with definite useful lives be amortized over their respective estimated useful lives to their estimated residual values, and reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable. We have substantial goodwill and other intangible assets, and we would be required to record a significant charge to earnings in our consolidated financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or intangible assets is determined. Any impairment charges or changes to the estimated amortization periods would result in a decrease in our earnings.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

If we fail to protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights adequately, our business could be harmed.

Our future success and competitive position depend in part on our ability to protect our intellectual property and proprietary technologies. To safeguard these rights, we rely on a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws and contractual protections in the United States and other jurisdictions, some of which afford only limited protection.

As of December 31, 2016, we had 14 issued patents and four patent applications pending in the United States. We also had one issued patent in Canada. We cannot assure you that any patents will issue from any patent applications, that patents that issue from such applications will give us the protection that we seek or that any such patents will not be challenged, invalidated, or circumvented. Any patents that may issue in the future from our pending or future patent applications may not provide sufficiently broad protection and may not be enforceable in actions against alleged infringers. In addition, we have registered the “Everbridge” and “Nixle” names in the United States, and have registered the “Everbridge” name in the European Union. We have registrations and/or pending applications for additional marks in the United States; however, we cannot assure

 

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you that any future trademark registrations will be issued for pending or future applications or that any registered trademarks will be enforceable or provide adequate protection of our proprietary rights.

In order to protect our unpatented proprietary technologies and processes, we rely on trade secret laws and confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, vendors and others. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary technology and trade secrets, unauthorized parties may attempt to misappropriate, reverse engineer or otherwise obtain and use them. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets, in which case we would not be able to assert trade secret rights, or develop similar technologies and processes. Further, the contractual provisions that we enter into may not prevent unauthorized use or disclosure of our proprietary technology or intellectual property rights and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our proprietary technology or intellectual property rights. Effective trade secret protection may not be available in every country in which our services are available or where we have employees or independent contractors. The loss of trade secret protection could make it easier for third parties to compete with our solutions by copying functionality. In addition, any changes in, or unexpected interpretations of, the trade secret and employment laws in any country in which we operate may compromise our ability to enforce our trade secret and intellectual property rights. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive business position.

In addition, to protect our intellectual property rights, we may be required to spend significant resources to monitor and protect these rights. Litigation brought to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights could be costly, time-consuming and distracting to management and could result in the impairment or loss of portions of our intellectual property. Failure to adequately enforce our intellectual property rights could also result in the impairment or loss of those rights. Furthermore, our efforts to enforce our intellectual property rights may be met with defenses, counterclaims and countersuits attacking the validity and enforceability of our intellectual property rights. Patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret laws offer us only limited protection and the laws of many of the countries in which we sell our services do not protect proprietary rights to the same extent as the United States and Europe. Accordingly, defense of our trademarks and proprietary technology may become an increasingly important issue as we continue to expand our operations and solution development into countries that provide a lower level of intellectual property protection than the United States or Europe. Policing unauthorized use of our intellectual property and technology is difficult and the steps we take may not prevent misappropriation of the intellectual property or technology on which we rely. For example, in the event of inadvertent or malicious disclosure of our proprietary technology, trade secret laws may no longer afford protection to our intellectual property rights in the areas not otherwise covered by patents or copyrights. Accordingly, we may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing upon or misappropriating our intellectual property.

We may elect to initiate litigation in the future to enforce or protect our proprietary rights or to determine the validity and scope of the rights of others. That litigation may not be ultimately successful and could result in substantial costs to us, the reduction or loss in intellectual property protection for our technology, the diversion of our management’s attention and harm to our reputation, any of which could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Our failure or inability to adequately protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

An assertion by a third party that we are infringing its intellectual property could subject us to costly and time-consuming litigation or expensive licenses that could harm our business and results of operations.

Patent and other intellectual property disputes are common in our industry and we have been involved in such disputes from time to time in the ordinary course of our business. Some companies, including some of our competitors, own large numbers of patents, copyrights and trademarks, which they may use to assert claims against us. Third parties may in the future assert claims of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of

 

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intellectual property rights against us. They may also assert such claims against our customers whom we typically indemnify against claims that our solution infringes, misappropriates or otherwise violates the intellectual property rights of third parties. As the numbers of products and competitors in our market increase and overlaps occur, claims of infringement, misappropriation and other violations of intellectual property rights may increase. Any claim of infringement, misappropriation or other violation of intellectual property rights by a third party, even those without merit, could cause us to incur substantial costs defending against the claim and could distract our management from our business.

As we seek to extend our platform and applications, we could be constrained by the intellectual property rights of others and it may also be more likely that competitors or other third parties will claim that our solutions infringe their proprietary rights. We might not prevail in any intellectual property infringement litigation given the complex technical issues and inherent uncertainties in such litigation. Defending such claims, regardless of their merit, could be time-consuming and distracting to management, result in costly litigation or settlement, cause development delays or require us to enter into royalty or licensing agreements. In addition, we currently have a limited portfolio of issued patents compared to our larger competitors, and therefore may not be able to effectively utilize our intellectual property portfolio to assert defenses or counterclaims in response to patent infringement claims or litigation brought against us by third parties. Further, litigation may involve patent holding companies or other adverse patent owners who have no relevant applications or revenue and against which our potential patents provide no deterrence, and many other potential litigants have the capability to dedicate substantially greater resources to enforce their intellectual property rights and to defend claims that may be brought against them. If our platform or any of our applications exceed the scope of in-bound licenses or violate any third-party proprietary rights, we could be required to withdraw those applications from the market, re-develop those applications or seek to obtain licenses from third parties, which might not be available on reasonable terms or at all. Any efforts to re-develop our platform and our applications, obtain licenses from third parties on favorable terms or license a substitute technology might not be successful and, in any case, might substantially increase our costs and harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. If we were compelled to withdraw any of our applications from the market, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be harmed.

We have indemnity obligations to our customers and certain of our channel partners for certain expenses and liabilities resulting from intellectual property infringement claims regarding our platform and our applications, which could force us to incur substantial costs.

We have indemnity obligations to our customers and certain of our channel partners for intellectual property infringement claims regarding our platform and our applications. As a result, in the case of infringement claims against these customers and channel partners, we could be required to indemnify them for losses resulting from such claims or to refund amounts they have paid to us. We also expect that some of our channel partners with whom we do not have express contractual obligations to indemnify for intellectual property infringement claims may seek indemnification from us in connection with infringement claims brought against them. We may elect to indemnify these channel partners where we have no contractual obligation to indemnify them and we will evaluate each such request on a case-by-case basis. If a channel partner elects to invest resources in enforcing a claim for indemnification against us, we could incur significant costs disputing it. If we do not succeed in disputing it, we could face substantial liability.

We may be subject to damages resulting from claims that our employees or contractors have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers or other parties.

We have in the past and may in the future be subject to claims that employees or contractors, or we, have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of our competitors or other parties. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. If we fail in defending against such claims, a court could order us to pay substantial damages and prohibit us from using technologies or features that are essential to our solutions, if such technologies or features are found to incorporate or be derived from the trade secrets or other proprietary information of these parties. In addition, we may lose valuable intellectual

 

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property rights or personnel. A loss of key personnel or their work product could hamper or prevent our ability to develop, market and support potential solutions or enhancements, which could severely harm our business. Even if we are successful in defending against these claims, such litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

The use of open source software in our platform and applications may expose us to additional risks and harm our intellectual property.

Our platform and some of our applications use or incorporate software that is subject to one or more open source licenses and we may incorporate open source software in the future. Open source software is typically freely accessible, usable and modifiable; however, certain open source software licenses require a user who intends to distribute the open source software as a component of the user’s software to disclose publicly part or all of the source code to the user’s software. In addition, certain open source software licenses require the user of such software to make any modifications or derivative works of the open source code available to others on potentially unfavorable terms or at no cost. Use and distribution of open source software may entail greater risks than use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or other contractual protections regarding infringement claims or the quality of the code.

The terms of many open source licenses to which we are subject have not been interpreted by U.S. or foreign courts, and accordingly there is a risk that those licenses could be construed in a manner that imposes unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to commercialize our platform and applications. In that event, we could be required to seek licenses from third parties in order to continue offering our platform and applications, to re-develop our platform and applications, to discontinue sales of our platform and applications or to release our proprietary software code in source code form under the terms of an open source license, any of which could harm our business. Further, given the nature of open source software, it may be more likely that third parties might assert copyright and other intellectual property infringement claims against us based on our use of these open source software programs. Litigation could be costly for us to defend, have a negative effect on our operating results and financial condition or require us to devote additional research and development resources to change our applications.

Although we are not aware of any use of open source software in our platform and applications that would require us to disclose all or a portion of the source code underlying our core applications, it is possible that such use may have inadvertently occurred in deploying our platform and applications, or that persons or entities may claim such disclosure to be required. Disclosing our proprietary source code could allow our competitors to create similar products with lower development effort and time and ultimately could result in a loss of sales for us. Disclosing the source code of our proprietary software could also make it easier for cyber attackers and other third parties to discover vulnerabilities in or to defeat the protections of our products, which could result in our products failing to provide our customers with the security they expect. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. Additionally, if a third-party software provider has incorporated certain types of open source software into software we license from such third party for our platform and applications without our knowledge, we could, under certain circumstances, be required to disclose the source code to our platform and applications. This could harm our intellectual property position and our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Risks Related to Government Regulation

Failure to comply with governmental laws and regulations could harm our business.

Our business is subject to regulation by various federal, state, local and foreign governments. For example, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991, or TCPA, restricts telemarketing and the use of automatic text messages without proper consent. The scope and interpretation of the laws that are or may be applicable to the delivery of text messages are continuously evolving and developing. If we do not comply with these laws or regulations or if we become liable under these laws or regulations due to the failure of our customers to comply with these laws by obtaining proper consent, we could face direct liability. In certain jurisdictions, these

 

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regulatory requirements may be more stringent than those in the United States. Noncompliance with applicable regulations or requirements could subject us to investigations, sanctions, enforcement actions, disgorgement of profits, fines, damages, civil and criminal penalties, injunctions or other collateral consequences. If any governmental sanctions are imposed, or if we do not prevail in any possible civil or criminal litigation, our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. In addition, responding to any action will likely result in a significant diversion of management’s attention and resources and an increase in professional fees. Enforcement actions and sanctions could harm our business, reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

A portion of our revenue is generated by subscriptions sold to governmental entities and heavily regulated organizations, which are subject to a number of challenges and risks.

A portion of our revenue is generated by subscriptions sold to government entities. Additionally, many of our current and prospective customers, such as those in the financial services, and healthcare and life sciences industries, are highly regulated and may be required to comply with more stringent regulations in connection with subscribing to and implementing our applications. Selling subscriptions to these entities can be highly competitive, expensive and time consuming, often requiring significant upfront time and expense without any assurance that we will successfully complete a sale.

Furthermore, engaging in sales activities to foreign governments introduces additional compliance risks specific to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act and other similar statutory requirements prohibiting bribery and corruption in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Governmental and highly regulated entities often require contract terms that differ from our standard arrangements. For example, the federal government provides grants to certain state and local governments for our applications and if such governmental entities do not continue to receive these grants, they have the ability to terminate their contracts without penalty. Governmental and highly regulated entities impose compliance requirements that are complicated, require preferential pricing or “most favored nation” terms and conditions, or are otherwise time consuming and expensive to satisfy. If we undertake to meet special standards or requirements and do not meet them, we could be subject to increased liability from our customers or regulators. Even if we do meet these special standards or requirements, the additional costs associated with providing our applications to government and highly regulated customers could harm our margins. Moreover, changes in the underlying regulatory conditions that affect these types of customers could harm our ability to efficiently provide our applications to them and to grow or maintain our customer base.

Governmental demand and payment for our applications may also be impacted by public sector budgetary cycles and funding authorizations, with funding reductions or delays adversely affecting public sector demand for our solutions.

We are subject to governmental regulation and other legal obligations, particularly related to privacy, data protection and information security, and our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business. Compliance with such laws could also impair our efforts to maintain and expand our customer base, and thereby decrease our revenue.

Our handling and storage of data is subject to a variety of laws and regulations, including regulation by various government agencies, including the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, and various state, local and foreign agencies. We collect personally identifiable information and other data directly from our customers and through our channel partners. We also process or otherwise handle personally identifiable information about our customers’ employees, customers and constituents in certain circumstances. We use this information to provide applications to our customers and to support, expand and improve our business. We may also share customers’ personally identifiable information with third parties as described in our privacy policy and/or as otherwise authorized by our customers.

The U.S. federal and various state and foreign governments have adopted or proposed legislation that regulates the collection, distribution, use and storage of personal information of individuals and that mandates security requirements with respect to certain personally identifiable information. In the United States, the FTC and

 

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numerous state attorneys general are imposing standards for the online collection, distribution, use and storage of data by applying federal and state consumer protection laws. The lack of a clear and universal standard for protecting such information means, however, that these obligations may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other requirements or our practices. Any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with privacy or security laws, policies, legal obligations or industry standards or any security incident that results in the unauthorized release or transfer of sensitive corporate information, personally identifiable information or other customer data may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation, fines and penalties and/or adverse publicity, and could cause our customers to lose trust in us, which could have an adverse effect on our reputation and business.

Some proposed laws or regulations concerning privacy, data protection and information security are in their early stages, and we cannot yet determine how these laws and regulations may be interpreted nor can we determine the impact these proposed laws and regulations, may have on our business. Such proposed laws and regulations may require companies to implement privacy and security policies, permit users to access, correct and delete personal information stored or maintained by such companies, inform individuals of security breaches that affect their personal information, and, in some cases, obtain individuals’ consent to use personal information for certain purposes. In addition, a foreign government could require that any personal information collected in a country not be disseminated outside of that country, and we may not be currently equipped to comply with such a requirement. Our failure to comply with federal, state and international data privacy laws and regulators could harm our ability to successfully operate our business and pursue our business goals.

In addition, several foreign countries and governmental bodies, including the European Union and Canada, have regulations governing the collection and use of personal information obtained from their residents, which are often more restrictive than those in the United States. Laws and regulations in these jurisdictions apply broadly to the collection, use, storage, disclosure and security of personal information that identifies or may be used to identify an individual, such as names, email addresses and in some jurisdictions, Internet Protocol, or IP, addresses. Such regulations and laws may be modified and new laws may be enacted in the future. Within the European Union, legislators recently adopted the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, which, when effective in May 2018, will replace the 1995 European Union Data Protection Directive and supersede applicable European Union member state legislation. The GDPR includes more stringent operational requirements for processors and controllers of personal data and imposes significant penalties for non-compliance. If our privacy or data security measures fail to comply with current or future laws and regulations, we may be subject to litigation, regulatory investigations, fines or other liabilities, as well as negative publicity and a potential loss of business. Moreover, if future laws and regulations limit our customers’ ability to use and share personal information or our ability to store, process and share personal information, demand for our applications could decrease, our costs could increase, and our business, results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

New interpretations of existing laws, regulations or standards could require us to incur additional compliance costs and could restrict our business operations, and any failure by us to comply with applicable requirements may result in governmental enforcement actions, litigation, fines and penalties or adverse publicity, which could have an adverse effect on our reputation and business.

Potential regulatory requirements placed on our applications and content could impose increased costs on us, delay or prevent our introduction of new applications, and impair the function or value of our existing applications.

Certain of our existing applications, such as CareConverge, a tailored version of our Secure Messaging application that is designed to comply with HIPAA, are and are likely to continue to be subject to increasing regulatory requirements in a number of ways and as we continue to introduce new applications, we may be subject to additional regulatory requirements and other risks that could be costly and difficult to comply with or that could harm our business. In addition, we market our applications and professional services in certain countries outside of the United States and plan to expand our local presence in regions such as Europe, the Middle East and Asia. If additional legal and/or regulatory requirements are implemented in the foreign countries in which we provide our services, the cost of developing or selling our applications may increase. As these

 

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requirements proliferate and as existing legal requirements become subject to new interpretations, we must change or adapt our applications and professional services to comply. Changing regulatory requirements might render certain of our applications obsolete or might block us from accomplishing our work or from developing new applications. This might in turn impose additional costs upon us to comply or to further develop our applications. It might also make introduction of new applications or service types more costly or more time-consuming than we currently anticipate. It might even prevent introduction by us of new applications or cause the continuation of our existing applications or professional services to become unprofitable or impossible.

Risks Related to this Offering and Ownership of Our Common Stock

Our stock price may be volatile and you may lose some or all of your investment.

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially as a result of a variety of factors, some of which are related in complex ways. Since shares of our common stock were sold in our initial public offering, or IPO, in September 2016 at a price of $12.00 per share, our stock price has ranged from an intraday low of $11.76 to an intraday high of $20.95 through March 22, 2017. Factors that may affect the market price of our common stock include:

 

    actual or anticipated fluctuations in our financial condition and operating results;

 

    variance in our financial performance from expectations of securities analysts;

 

    changes in the prices of our applications;

 

    changes in our projected operating and financial results;

 

    changes in laws or regulations applicable to our platform and applications;

 

    announcements by us or our competitors of significant business developments, acquisitions or new applications;

 

    our involvement in any litigation;

 

    our sale of our common stock or other securities in the future;

 

    changes in senior management or key personnel;

 

    trading volume of our common stock;

 

    changes in the anticipated future size and growth rate of our market; and

 

    general economic, regulatory and market conditions.

Recently, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. These fluctuations have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. Broad market and industry fluctuations, as well as general economic, political, regulatory and market conditions, may negatively impact the market price of our common stock. In the past, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their securities have been subject to securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future, which could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention.

An active public trading market for our common stock may not be sustained.

Prior to the completion of our IPO in September 2016, no public market for our common stock existed. Although our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market, we cannot assure you that an active public trading market for our common stock will continue to develop or be sustained. If an active market for our common stock

 

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does not continue to develop or is not sustained, it may be difficult for investors in our common stock to sell shares without depressing the market price for the shares or to sell the shares at all. An inactive market may also impair our ability to raise capital to continue to fund operations by selling shares and may impair our ability to acquire other companies or technologies by using our shares as consideration.

We are an emerging growth company, and we cannot be certain if the reduced reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are an emerging growth company, as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or the JOBS Act, enacted in April 2012. For as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company, we may take advantage of exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in this prospectus and our periodic reports and proxy statements and exemptions from the requirements of holding nonbinding advisory votes on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of the IPO, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1 billion or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which requires the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates to exceed $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

As a result of becoming a public company, we are obligated to develop and maintain a system of effective internal control over financial reporting. We may not complete our analysis of our internal control over financial reporting in a timely manner, or these internal controls may not be determined to be effective, which may harm investor confidence in our company and, as a result, the value of our common stock.

We will be required, pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to furnish a report by management on, among other things, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in the second annual report we file with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC. This assessment will need to include disclosure of any material weaknesses identified by our management in our internal control over financial reporting. However, our auditors will not be required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act if we take advantage of the exemptions available to us through the JOBS Act.

We are in the very early stages of the costly and challenging process of compiling the system and process documentation necessary to perform the evaluation needed to comply with Section 404. In this regard, we will need to continue to dedicate internal resources, engage outside consultants and adopt a detailed work plan to assess and document the adequacy of internal control over financial reporting, continue steps to improve control processes as appropriate, validate through testing that controls are functioning as documented and implement a continuous reporting and improvement process for internal control over financial reporting. As we transition to the requirements of reporting as a public company, we may need to add additional finance staff. We may not be able to remediate any future material weaknesses, or to complete our evaluation, testing and any required remediation in a timely fashion. During the evaluation and testing process, if we identify one or more material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, we will be unable to assert that our internal controls are effective. If we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or if our auditors are unable to express an opinion on the effectiveness of our internal controls when they are required to issue such opinion, investors could lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, the market price of our common stock could decline, and we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by the NASDAQ Stock Market, the SEC or other regulatory authorities. Failure to remedy any material weakness in our

 

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internal control over financial reporting, or to implement or maintain other effective control systems required of public companies, could also restrict our future access to the capital markets.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding our stock, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock will be influenced by the research and reports that industry or securities analysts publish about us or our business. We do not have any control over these analysts. If any of the analysts who cover us issue an adverse or misleading opinion regarding us, our business model, our intellectual property or our stock performance, or if operating results fail to meet the expectations of analysts, our stock price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of us or fail to publish reports on us regularly, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause our stock price or trading volume to decline.

We will incur increased costs as a result of operating as a public company and our management will be required to devote substantial time to new compliance initiatives and corporate governance practices.

As a public company, and particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the listing requirements of the NASDAQ Stock Market and other applicable securities rules and regulations impose various requirements on public companies. Our management and other personnel will need to devote a substantial amount of time to compliance with these requirements. Moreover, these rules and regulations will increase our legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly. We cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we will incur as a public company or the timing of such costs. Such additional costs going forward could negatively affect our financial results.

We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future, and accordingly, stockholders must rely on stock appreciation for any return on their investment.

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and do not intend to pay any cash dividends to holders of our common stock in the foreseeable future. In addition, our ability to pay cash dividends is currently prohibited by the terms of our existing credit agreement and may be prohibited by future credit agreements. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our common stock will be your sole source of gain for the foreseeable future.

Our executive officers, directors and principal stockholders own a significant percentage of our stock and will be able to exert significant control over matters subject to stockholder approval.

Following this offering, our directors, executive officers and holders of more than 5% of our common stock, some of whom are represented on our board of directors, together with their affiliates will beneficially own more than     % of the voting power of our outstanding capital stock, assuming that the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares. As a result, these stockholders will be able to exert significant control over the outcome of matters submitted to our stockholders for approval. This ownership could affect the value of your shares of common stock by, for example, these stockholders electing to delay, defer or prevent a change in corporate control, merger, consolidation, takeover or other business combination. This concentration of ownership may also adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

We may invest or spend the proceeds of our IPO and this offering in ways with which you may not agree or in ways which may not yield a return.

We anticipate that the remaining net proceeds from our IPO and the net proceeds from this offering will be used for general corporate purposes, including working capital. We may also use a portion of the net proceeds to acquire complementary businesses, applications, services or technologies. However, we do not have any

 

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agreements or commitments for any acquisitions at this time. Our management will have considerable discretion in the application of the net proceeds, and you will not have the opportunity to assess whether the proceeds are being used appropriately. The net proceeds may be invested with a view towards long-term benefits for our stockholders and this may not increase our operating results or market value. The failure by our management to apply these funds effectively may adversely affect the return on your investment.

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and under Delaware law could make an acquisition of us more difficult, limit attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management and limit the market price of our common stock.

Provisions in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change in control or changes in our management. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws include provisions that:

 

    authorize our board of directors to issue preferred stock, without further stockholder action and with voting liquidation, dividend and other rights superior to our common stock;

 

    require that any action to be taken by our stockholders be effected at a duly called annual or special meeting and not by written consent, and limit the ability of our stockholders to call special meetings;

 

    establish an advance notice procedure for stockholder proposals to be brought before an annual meeting, including proposed nominations of persons for director nominees;

 

    establish that our board of directors is divided into three classes, with directors in each class serving three-year staggered terms;

 

    require the approval of holders of two-thirds of the shares entitled to vote at an election of directors to adopt, amend or repeal our bylaws or amend or repeal the provisions of our certificate of incorporation regarding the election and removal of directors and the ability of stockholders to take action by written consent or call a special meeting;

 

    prohibit cumulative voting in the election of directors; and

 

    provide that vacancies on our board of directors may be filled only by the vote of a majority of directors then in office, even though less than a quorum.

These provisions may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management by making it more difficult for stockholders to replace members of our board of directors, which is responsible for appointing the members of our management. In addition, because we are incorporated in Delaware, we are governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware, which generally prohibits a Delaware corporation from engaging in any of a broad range of business combinations with any “interested” stockholder for a period of three years following the date on which the stockholder became an “interested” stockholder. Any of the foregoing provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock, and they could deter potential acquirers of our company, thereby reducing the likelihood that you would receive a premium for your common stock in an acquisition.

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation designates the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware as the exclusive forum for certain litigation that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us.

Pursuant to our amended and restated certificate of incorporation, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware is the sole and exclusive forum for (1) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf, (2) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or other employees to us or our stockholders, (3) any action asserting

 

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a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the Delaware General Corporation Law, our amended and restated certificate of incorporation or our amended and restated bylaws or (4) any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation further provides that any person or entity purchasing or otherwise acquiring any interest in shares of our common stock is deemed to have notice of and consented to the foregoing provision. The forum selection clause in our amended and restated certificate of incorporation may limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us.

Future sales of our common stock in the public market could cause our share price to decline.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales might occur, could depress the market price of our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of additional equity securities. We are unable to predict the effect that sales may have on the prevailing market price of our common stock.

All of our shares of common stock, including those sold in this offering, will be freely tradable without restrictions or further registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, except for any shares held by our “affiliates,” as that term is defined under Rule 144 under the Securities Act, or subject to lock-up agreements.

Upon the expiration of lock-up agreements entered into in connection with this offering,                  shares of our common stock will be eligible for sale in the public market beginning on the 91st day following the date of this prospectus, provided that shares held by our affiliates will remain subject to volume, manner of sale and other resale limitations set forth in Rule 144. See “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” for a more detailed description of the restrictions on selling shares of our common stock after this offering.

Certain holders of shares of our common stock are entitled to rights with respect to the registration of their shares under the Securities Act, subject to the lock-up arrangements described in “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” and “Underwriting.” Registration of these shares under the Securities Act would result in the shares becoming freely tradable without restriction under the Securities Act, except for shares held by our affiliates. Any sales of securities by these stockholders could have a material adverse effect on the trading price of our common stock.

Additionally, Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, on behalf of the underwriters, may with our consent, at any time with or without notice, release all or any portion of the shares subject to the lock-up agreements for this offering or related to our IPO, which would result in more shares being available for sale in the public market at earlier dates. Sales of common stock by existing stockholders in the public market, the availability of these shares for sale, our issuance of securities or the perception that any of these events might occur could materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Purchasers in this offering will experience immediate and substantial dilution in the book value of their investment.

If you purchase shares of our common stock in this offering, you will suffer immediate dilution of $         per share in net tangible book value after giving effect to the sale of common stock in this offering at an assumed public offering price of $         per share, the closing price of our common as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on             , 2017. See “Dilution.” If outstanding options to purchase our common stock are exercised in the future, you will experience additional dilution.

 

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SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. The forward-looking statements are contained principally in the sections of this prospectus entitled “Prospectus Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business,” but are also contained elsewhere in this prospectus. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “might,” “objective,” “ongoing,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “potential,” “should,” “will,” or “would,” or the negative of these terms, or other comparable terminology intended to identify statements about the future. These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from the information expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Although we believe that we have a reasonable basis for each forward-looking statement contained in this prospectus, we caution you that these statements are based on a combination of facts and factors currently known by us and our expectations of the future, about which we cannot be certain. Forward-looking statements include statements about:

 

    our ability to continue to add new customers, maintain existing customers and sell new applications to new and existing customers;

 

    the effects of increased competition as well as innovations by new and existing competitors in our market;

 

    our ability to adapt to technological change and effectively enhance, innovate and scale our applications;

 

    our ability to effectively manage or sustain our growth and to achieve profitability on an annual and consistent basis;

 

    potential acquisitions and integration of complementary business and technologies;

 

    our expected use of proceeds;

 

    our ability to maintain, or strengthen awareness of, our brand;

 

    perceived or actual integrity, reliability, quality or compatibility problems with our applications, including related to unscheduled downtime or outages;

 

    statements regarding future revenue, hiring plans, expenses, capital expenditures, capital requirements and stock performance;

 

    our ability to attract and retain qualified employees and key personnel and further expand our overall headcount;

 

    our ability to grow both domestically and internationally;

 

    our ability to stay abreast of new or modified laws and regulations that currently apply or become applicable to our business both in the United States and internationally;

 

    our ability to maintain, protect and enhance our intellectual property;

 

    costs associated with defending intellectual property infringement and other claims; and

 

    the future trading prices of our common stock and the impact of securities analysts’ reports on these prices.

We caution you that the foregoing list may not contain all of the forward-looking statements made in this prospectus.

 

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You should refer to the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus for a discussion of important factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements.

As a result of these factors, we cannot assure you that the forward-looking statements in this prospectus will prove to be accurate. Furthermore, if our forward-looking statements prove to be inaccurate, the inaccuracy may be material. In light of the significant uncertainties in these forward-looking statements, you should not regard these statements as a representation or warranty by us or any other person that we will achieve our objectives and plans in any specified time frame or at all. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. In addition, statements that “we believe” and similar statements reflect our beliefs and opinions on the relevant subject. These statements are based upon information available to us as of the date of this prospectus, and while we believe such information forms a reasonable basis for such statements, such information may be limited or incomplete, and our statements should not be read to indicate that we have conducted an exhaustive inquiry into, or review of, all potentially available relevant information. These statements are inherently uncertain and investors are cautioned not to unduly rely upon these statements.

You should read this prospectus and the documents that we reference in this prospectus and have filed as exhibits to the registration statement, of which this prospectus is a part, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. We qualify all of our forward-looking statements by these cautionary statements.

 

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INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

Unless otherwise indicated, information contained in this prospectus concerning our industry and the market in which we operate, including our general expectations and market position, market opportunity and market size is based on information from various sources, including independent industry publications by Frost & Sullivan and Markets and Markets. In presenting this information, we have also made assumptions based on such data and other similar sources, and on our knowledge of, and in our experience to date in, the markets for our applications. This information involves a number of assumptions and limitations, and you are cautioned not to give undue weight to such estimates. Although neither we nor the underwriters have independently verified the accuracy or completeness of any third-party information, we believe the market position, market opportunity and market size information included in this prospectus is reliable. The industry in which we operate is subject to a high degree of uncertainty and risk due to a variety of factors, including those described in the “Risk Factors” section. These and other factors could cause results to differ materially from those expressed in the estimates made by the independent parties and by us.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds from our issuance and sale of                 shares of our common stock in this offering will be approximately $         million, based upon an assumed public offering price of $         per share, the closing price of our common as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on                 , 2017, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of shares by the selling stockholders, although we will bear the costs, other than underwriting discounts and commissions, associated with those sales.

The principal purposes of this offering are to facilitate an orderly distribution of our shares by selling stockholders, increase our public float and increase our financial flexibility. Although we have not yet determined with certainty the manner in which we will allocate the net proceeds of this offering, we expect to use the net proceeds from this offering for working capital and other general corporate purposes, including investments in sales and marketing in the United States and internationally and in research and development. We may also use a portion of the proceeds from this offering for acquisitions or strategic investments in complementary businesses or technologies, although we do not currently have any plans for any such acquisitions or investments. We have not allocated specific amounts of net proceeds for any of these purposes.

The expected use of net proceeds from this offering represents our intentions based upon our present plans and business conditions. We cannot predict with certainty all of the particular uses for the proceeds of this offering or the amounts that we will actually spend on the uses set forth above. Accordingly, our management will have significant flexibility in applying the net proceeds of this offering. The timing and amount of our actual expenditures will be based on many factors, including cash flows from operations and the anticipated growth of our business. Pending their use, we intend to invest the net proceeds of this offering in a variety of capital-preservation investments, including short- and intermediate-term, interest-bearing investment-grade securities.

 

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MARKET PRICE OF COMMON STOCK

Our common stock has been listed on the NASDAQ Global Market under the symbol “EVBG” since September 16, 2016. Prior to that date, there was no public trading market for our common stock. Our initial public offering was priced at $12.00 per share on September 15, 2016. The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low sales prices per share of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market:

 

     Low      High  

Fiscal Year ending December 31, 2016

     

Third Quarter (beginning September 16, 2016)

   $ 11.76      $ 18.73  

Fourth Quarter

   $ 12.92      $ 20.66  

Fiscal Year ending December 31, 2017

     

First Quarter (through March 22, 2017)

   $ 16.63      $ 20.95  

On March 22, 2017, the closing price of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market was $19.33 per share.

As of December 31, 2016, we had 525 holders of record of our common stock. The actual number of stockholders is greater than this number of record holders, and includes stockholders who are beneficial owners, but whose shares are held in street name by brokers and other nominees. This number of holders of record also does not include stockholders whose shares may be held in trust by other entities.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

We have never declared or paid any dividends on our capital stock. We currently intend to retain all available funds and any future earnings for the operation and expansion of our business and, therefore, we do not anticipate declaring or paying cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, prospects, contractual arrangements, any limitations on payment of dividends present in our current and future debt agreements, and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. We are subject to several covenants under our debt arrangements that place restrictions on our ability to pay dividends.

 

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CAPITALIZATION

The following table sets forth our cash and our capitalization as of December 31, 2016:

 

    on an actual basis; and

 

    on an as adjusted basis to reflect the sale of                 shares of common stock in this offering at an assumed public offering price of $         per share, the closing price of our common as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on                 , 2017, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

You should read this table together with “Selected Consolidated Financial Statements,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     As of December 31, 2016  
     Actual     As
Adjusted(1)
 
     (in thousands, except
share and per share
data)
 

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 60,765     $  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,0000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding, actual and as adjusted

            

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized, 27,150,674 shares issued and outstanding, actual; 100,000,000 shares authorized,                  shares issued and outstanding, as adjusted

     27    

Additional paid-in capital

     132,246    

Accumulated deficit

     (89,618  

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (303  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     42,352    
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total capitalization

   $ 42,352     $  
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1) The as adjusted information set forth above is illustrative only and will change based on the actual public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing.

The number of shares of our common stock shown as issued and outstanding on an as adjusted basis in the table above is based on 27,150,674 shares of common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2016, and excludes:

 

    1,884,425 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of December 31, 2016, at a weighted-average exercise price of $10.02 per share;

 

    2,005,483 shares of our common stock reserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year; and

 

    500,000 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year.

 

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DILUTION

If you invest in our common stock, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the public offering price per share of our common stock and the as adjusted net tangible book value per share of our common stock immediately after the completion of this offering.

Our historical net tangible book value as of December 31, 2016 was $28.7 million, or $1.06 per share of common stock. Our historical net tangible book value per share represents our total tangible assets less our total liabilities, divided by the number of shares of common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2016.

After giving effect our sale of                  shares of common stock in this offering at an assumed public offering price of $         per share, the closing price of our common as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on             , 2017, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, our as adjusted net tangible book value as of December 31, 2016 would have been $         million, or $         per share of common stock. This amount represents an immediate increase in as adjusted net tangible book value of $         per share to our existing stockholders and an immediate dilution of $         per share to investors participating in this offering. We determine dilution per share to investors participating in this offering by subtracting as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering from the assumed public offering price per share paid by investors participating in this offering.

The following table illustrates this dilution on a per share basis to new investors:

 

Assumed public offering price per share

      $               

Historical net tangible book value per share as of December 31, 2016

   $ 1.06     
  

 

 

    

Increase in net tangible book value per share attributed to new investors purchasing shares from us in this offering

     
  

 

 

    

As adjusted net tangible book value per share after giving effect to this offering

     
     

 

 

 

Dilution in as adjusted net tangible book value per share to new investors in this offering

      $           
     

 

 

 

The dilution information discussed above is illustrative only and will change based on the actual public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing.

The foregoing table and calculations above are based on 27,150,674 shares of common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2016, and exclude:

 

    1,884,425 shares of common stock issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding as of December 31, 2016, at a weighted-average exercise price of $10.02 per share;

 

    2,005,483 shares of our common stock reserved for future issuance pursuant to our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year; and

 

    500,000 shares of common stock reserved for future issuance under our 2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which includes provisions that automatically increase the number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance thereunder each year.

To the extent that options are exercised, new options or other securities are issued under our equity incentive plans, or we issue additional shares of common stock in the future, there will be further dilution to investors participating in this offering. In addition, we may choose to raise additional capital because of market conditions or strategic considerations, even if we believe that we have sufficient funds for our current or future operating plans. If we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of these securities could result in further dilution to our stockholders.

 

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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA

We derived the selected consolidated statements of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2015 and 2016 and the selected consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2015 and 2016 from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. We derived the selected consolidated statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2013 from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this prospectus. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

When you read this selected consolidated financial data, it is important that you read it together with the historical consolidated financial statements and related notes to those statements, as well as “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” included elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
           2012                 2013                 2014                 2015                 2016        
     (in thousands, except shares and per share data)  

Revenue

   $ 23,361     $ 30,040     $ 42,421     $ 58,720     $ 76,846  

Cost of revenue(1)

     7,570       8,699       12,089       19,789       23,767  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     15,791       21,341       30,332       38,931       53,079  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

          

Sales and marketing(1)

   $ 7,998     $ 11,695     $ 15,818     $ 25,925     $ 34,847  

Research and development(1)

     5,057       5,697       7,365       11,521       14,765  

General and administrative(1)

     7,371       4,352       7,435       12,272       14,293  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     20,426       21,744       30,618       49,718       63,905  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

     (4,635     (403     (286     (10,787     (10,826

Other expenses, net

     (399     (368     (426     (599     (484
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

     (5,034     (771     (712     (11,386     (11,310

(Provision for) benefit from income taxes

     (57     (118     89       562       24  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (5,091   $ (889   $ (623   $ (10,824   $ (11,286
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss attributable to common shareholders

   $ (5,091   $ (889   $ (623   $ (10,824   $ (11,286

Net loss per share attributable to common shareholders—basic

   $ (0.52   $ (0.08   $ (0.05   $ (0.88   $ (0.68

Net loss per share attributable to common shareholders—diluted

   $ (0.52   $ (0.08   $ (0.05   $ (0.88   $ (0.68

Weighted average shares outstanding—basic

     9,873,715       11,040,428       11,788,883       12,257,413       16,659,561  

Weighted average shares outstanding—diluted

     9,873,715       11,040,428       11,788,883       12,257,413       16,659,561  

 

  (1) Includes stock-based compensation expense and depreciation and amortization expense as follows:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2012              2013              2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Stock-based compensation expense:

              

Cost of revenue

   $ 3      $ 48      $ 82      $ 150      $ 180  

Sales and marketing

     10        82        120        315        725  

Research and development

     424        28        147        297        348  

General and administrative

     1,859        18        27        760        1,848  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,296      $ 176      $ 376      $ 1,522      $ 3,101  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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     Year Ended December 31,  
     2012      2013      2014      2015      2016  
     (in thousands)  

Depreciation and amortization expense:

              

Cost of revenue

   $ 2,481      $ 2,374      $ 1,615      $ 4,457      $ 6,247  

Sales and marketing

     23        46        101        227        208  

Research and development

     19        16        31        134        265  

General and administrative

     9        19        765        1,158        1,022  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,532      $ 2,455      $ 2,512      $ 5,976      $ 7,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  (2) See notes (2) and (14) to our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this prospectus for further details on the calculation of basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to common stockholders.

 

     As of December 31,  
         2012             2013             2014             2015             2016      
     (in thousands)  

Consolidated Balance Sheet Data:

          

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 1,711     $ 3,040     $ 4,412     $ 8,578     $ 60,765  

Working capital, excluding deferred revenue

     (275     3,317       1,760       15,160       70,488  

Total assets

     15,143       18,101       40,066       53,509       108,322  

Total deferred revenue

     17,566       20,614       28,844       40,467       52,634  

Total debt

     4,748       3,366       6,863       16,970        

Total liabilities

     27,077       30,189       45,393       69,560       65,970  

Total stockholders’ (deficit) equity

     (11,934     (12,088     (5,327     (16,051     42,352  

 

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and other financial information included elsewhere in this prospectus. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this prospectus, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, includes forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should review the “Risk Factors” section of this prospectus for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and analysis.

Overview

Everbridge is a global software company that provides enterprise software applications that automate and accelerate organizations’ operational response to critical events in order to keep people safe and businesses running. During public safety threats such as active shooter situations, terrorist attacks or severe weather conditions, as well as critical business events such as IT outages, cyber-attacks or other incidents such as product recalls or supply-chain interruptions, our SaaS-based platform enables our customers to quickly and reliably aggregate and assess threat data, locate people at risk and responders able to assist, automate the execution of pre-defined communications processes and track progress on executing response plans. Our customers use our platform to identify and assess hundreds of different types of threats to their organizations, people, assets or brand. Our solutions enable organizations to deliver intelligent, contextual messages to, and receive verification of delivery from, hundreds or millions of recipients, across multiple communications modalities such as voice, SMS and e-mail. Our applications enable the delivery of messages in near real-time to more than 100 different communication devices, in over 200 countries and territories, in 15 languages and dialects – all simultaneously. We delivered 1.5 billion communications in 2016. We automate the process of sending contextual notifications to multiple constituencies and receiving return information on a person’s or operation’s status so that organizations can act quickly and precisely. Our Critical Event Management platform is comprised of a comprehensive set of software applications that address the full spectrum of tasks an organization has to perform to manage a critical event, including Mass Notification, Incident Management, Safety Connection, IT Alerting, Visual Command Center, Crisis Commander, Community Engagement and Secure Messaging. We believe that our broad suite of integrated, enterprise applications delivered via a single global platform is a significant competitive advantage in the market for Critical Event Management solutions, which we refer to generally as CEM.

Our customer base has grown from 867 customers at the end of 2011 to more than 3,200 customers as of December 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2016, our customers were based in 28 countries and included eight of the 10 largest U.S. cities, eight of the 10 largest U.S.-based investment banks, 24 of the 25 busiest North American airports, six of the 10 largest global consulting firms, six of the 10 largest global auto makers, all four of the largest global accounting firms, four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health care providers and four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health insurers. We provide our applications to customers of varying sizes, including enterprises, small businesses, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and governmental agencies. Our customers span a wide variety of industries including technology, energy, financial services, healthcare and life sciences, manufacturing, media and entertainment, retail, higher education and professional services.

We sell all of our critical communications applications on a subscription basis. We generally enter into contracts that range from one to three years in length, with an average contract duration of 2.0 years as of December 31, 2016, and generally bill and collect payment annually in advance. We derive most of our revenue from subscriptions to applications. Over 90% of the revenue that we recognized in each of the eight most recently completed quarters was generated from contracts entered into in prior quarters or renewals of those contracts; the balance of the revenue that we recognized in each such quarter was generated from contracts entered into with new customers or new contracts, other than renewals, entered into with existing customers in such quarter.

 

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Historically, we derived more than 86% of our revenue in each of the last three fiscal years from sales of our Mass Notification application. Our pricing model is based on the number of applications subscribed to and, per application, the number of people, locations and things connected to our platform as well as the volume of communications. We also offer premium services including data feeds for social media, threat intelligence and weather. We generate additional revenue by expanding the number of applications that our customers subscribe to and the number of contacts and devices connected to our platform.

We generated revenue of $30.0 million in 2013, $42.4 million in 2014, $58.7 million in 2015 and $76.8 million in 2016, representing year-over-year increases of 41% in 2014, 38% in 2015 and 31% in 2016. We had net losses of $0.9 million, $0.6 million, $10.8 million and $11.3 million in 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively.

As of December 31, 2015 and 2016, 17% and 14% of our customers, respectively, were located outside of the United States and these customers generated 14% and 10% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2015 and 2016, respectively.

We have focused on rapidly growing our business and believe that the future growth of our business is dependent on many factors, including our ability to increase the functionality of our platform and applications, expand our customer base, accelerate adoption of our applications beyond Mass Notification within our existing customer base and expand our international presence. Our future growth will also depend on the growth in the market for critical communications solutions and our ability to effectively compete. In order to further penetrate the market for critical communications solutions and capitalize on what we believe to be a significant opportunity, we intend to continue to invest in research and development, build-out our data center infrastructure and services capabilities and hire additional sales representatives, both domestically and internationally, to drive sales to new customers and incremental sales of new applications to existing customers. Nevertheless, we expect to continue to incur losses in the near term and, if we are unable to achieve our growth objectives, we may not be able to achieve profitability.

Recent Developments

In September 2016, we closed our initial public offering, at which time we sold a total of 6,250,000 shares of our common stock. We received net cash proceeds of $66.1 million, net of underwriting discounts and commissions and other costs associated with the offering paid or payable by us.

In December 2016, we acquired 100% of the shares of Svensk Krisledning AB, or Crisis Commander. We acquired Crisis Commander for cash consideration of approximately $2.3 million with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $0.4 million. Crisis Commander is a SaaS mobile crisis management company operating out of Sweden.

In January 2017, we acquired 100% of the shares of IDV Solutions, LLC, or IDV. We acquired IDV for cash consideration of approximately $21.3 million, with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $6.2 million. IDV is a provider of threat assessment and operational visualization software located in Lansing, Michigan.

Although not required by Rule 3-05 of Regulation S-X to be filed with this registration statement on Form S-1, the Company nevertheless plans to file audited financial statements of IDV as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, as well as pro forma financial information reflecting the impact of the IDV acquisition as though it had occurred on January 1, 2016, in a pre-effective amendment to this registration statement on Form S-1.

Presentation of Financial Statements

Our consolidated financial statements include the accounts of our wholly-owned subsidiaries. Business acquisitions are included in our consolidated financial statements from the date of the acquisition. Our purchase accounting resulted in all assets and liabilities of acquired businesses being recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition dates. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

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We report our financial results as one operating segment. Our operating results are regularly reviewed on a consolidated basis by our chief executive officer, who is our chief operating decision maker, principally to make strategic decisions regarding how we allocate our resources and to assess our consolidated operating performance.

Other Metrics

We regularly monitor a number of financial and operating metrics in order to measure our current performance and estimate our future performance. Our other business metrics may be calculated in a manner different than similar other business metrics used by other companies.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2014     2015     2016  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenue retention rate

     111     112     116

Adjusted EBITDA

   $ 2,524     $ (3,351   $ 5  

Adjusted gross margin

   $ 30,663     $ 41,084     $ 55,577  

Free cash flow

   $ 3,884     $ (2,953   $ 3,039  

 

    Revenue Retention Rate.  We calculate our revenue retention rate by dividing (1) total revenue in the current 12-month period from those customers who were customers during the prior 12-month period by (2) total revenue from all customers in the prior 12-month period. For the purposes of calculating our revenue retention rate, we count as customers all entities with whom we had contracts in the applicable period other than (1) customers of our wholly-owned subsidiary, Microtech, which generates an immaterial amount of our revenue in any given year and (2) in the first year following our acquisition of another business, customers that we acquired in connection with such acquisition. We believe that our ability to retain our customers and expand their use of our solutions over time is an indicator of the stability of our revenue base and the long-term value of our customer relationships. Our revenue retention rate provides insight into the impact on current period revenue of the number of new customers acquired during the prior 12-month period, the timing of our implementation of those new customers, growth in the usage of our solutions by our existing customers and customer attrition. If our revenue retention rate for a period exceeds 100%, this means that the revenue retained during the period including upsells more than offset the revenue that we lost from customers that did not renew their contracts during the period. Our revenue retention rate may decline or fluctuate as a result of a number of factors, including customers’ satisfaction or dissatisfaction with our platform and applications, pricing, economic conditions or overall reductions in our customers’ spending levels.

 

    Adjusted EBITDA.  Adjusted EBITDA represents our net loss before interest income and interest expense, income tax expense and benefit, depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. We do not consider these items to be indicative of our core operating performance. The items that are non-cash include depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. Adjusted EBITDA is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans, make strategic decisions regarding the allocation of capital and invest in initiatives that are focused on cultivating new markets for our solutions. In particular, the exclusion of certain expenses in calculating adjusted EBITDA facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis. Adjusted EBITDA is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. See note 2 to the table contained in “Summary Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Other Metrics” for a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net loss, the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP for 2014, 2015 and 2016, and a discussion of the limitations of adjusted EBITDA.

 

   

Adjusted Gross Margin.  Adjusted gross margin represents gross profit plus stock-based compensation and amortization of acquired intangibles. Adjusted gross margin is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating

 

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plans. The exclusion of stock-based compensation expense and amortization of acquired intangibles facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis. In the near term, we expect these expenses to continue to negatively impact our gross profit. Adjusted gross margin is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. See note 3 to the table contained in “Summary Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Other Metrics” for a reconciliation of adjusted gross margin and a reconciliation of adjusted gross margin to gross profit, the most comparable GAAP measurement, for 2014, 2015 and 2016, and a discussion of the limitations of adjusted gross margin.

 

    Free Cash Flow.  Free cash flow represents net cash provided by operating activities minus capital expenditures and capitalized software development costs. Free cash flow is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans. The exclusion of capital expenditures and amounts capitalized for internally-developed software facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis and excludes items that we do not consider to be indicative of our core operating performance. Free cash flow is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. See note 4 to the table contained in “Summary Consolidated Financial and Other Data—Other Metrics” for a reconciliation of free cash flow to net cash for operating activities, the most comparable GAAP measurement, for 2014, 2015 and 2016, and a discussion of the limitations of free cash flow.

Additional Supplemental Non-GAAP Financial Measures

To supplement our consolidated financial statements, which are prepared and presented in accordance with GAAP, we provide investors with certain additional supplemental non-GAAP financial measures, including non-GAAP cost of revenue, non-GAAP gross profit, non-GAAP sales and marketing expense, non-GAAP research and development expense, non-GAAP general and administrative expense, non-GAAP total operating expenses, non-GAAP operating loss and non-GAAP net loss, which we collectively refer to as non-GAAP financial measures. These non-GAAP financial measures exclude all or a combination of the following (as reflected in the following reconciliation tables): stock-based compensation expense and amortization of acquired intangibles. The presentation of the non-GAAP financial measures is not intended to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for, or superior to, the financial information prepared and presented in accordance with GAAP. We use these non-GAAP financial measures for financial and operational decision-making purposes and as a means to evaluate period-to-period comparisons. We believe that these non-GAAP financial measures provide useful information about our operating results, enhance the overall understanding of past financial performance and future prospects and allow for greater transparency with respect to metrics used by our management in its financial and operational decision making. While our non-GAAP financial measures are an important tool for financial and operational decision making and for evaluating our own operating results over different periods of time, you should consider our non-GAAP financial measures alongside our GAAP financial results.

We exclude stock-based compensation expense because of varying available valuation methodologies, subjective assumptions and the variety of equity instruments that can impact our non-cash expense. We believe that providing non-GAAP financial measures that exclude stock-based compensation expense allow for more meaningful comparisons between our operating results from period to period. We believe that excluding the impact of amortization of acquired intangibles allows for more meaningful comparisons between operating results from period to period as the intangibles are valued at the time of acquisition and are amortized over a period of several years after the acquisition. Accordingly, we believe that excluding these expenses provides investors and management with greater visibility of the underlying performance of our business operations, facilitates comparison of our results with other periods and may also facilitate comparison with the results of other companies in our industry.

There are limitations in using non-GAAP financial measures because the non-GAAP financial measures are not prepared in accordance with GAAP, may be different from non-GAAP financial measures used by other companies and exclude expenses that may have a material impact upon our reported financial results. Further, stock-based compensation expense has been and will continue to be for the foreseeable future a significant recurring expense in our business and an important part of the compensation provided to our employees.

 

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The following table reconciles our GAAP to non-GAAP financial measures for the years ended 2014, 2015 and 2016:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014             2015             2016      
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cost of revenue

   $ 12,089     $ 19,789     $ 23,767  

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     (249     (2,003     (2,318

Stock-based compensation expense

     (82     (150     (180
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP cost of revenue

     11,758       17,636       21,269  

Gross profit

     30,332       38,931       53,079  

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     249       2,003       2,318  

Stock-based compensation expense

     82       150       180  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP gross profit

     30,663       41,084       55,577  

Non-GAAP gross margin

     72.28     69.97     72.32

Sales and marketing expense

     15,818       25,925       34,847  

Stock-based compensation expense

     (120     (315     (725
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP sales and marketing

     15,698       25,610       34,122  

Research and development expense

     7,365       11,521       14,765  

Stock-based compensation expense

     (147     (297     (348
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP research and development

     7,218       11,224       14,417  

General and administrative expense

     7,435       12,272       14,293  

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     (720     (1,088     (916

Stock-based compensation expense

     (27     (760     (1,848
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP general and administrative

     6,688       10,424       11,529  

Total operating expenses

     30,618       49,718       63,905  

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     (720     (1,088     (916

Stock-based compensation expense

     (294     (1,372     (2,921
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP total operating expenses

   $ 29,604     $ 47,258     $ 60,068  

Operating loss

   $ (286   $ (10,787   $ (10,826

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     969       3,091       3,234  

Stock-based compensation expense

     376       1,522       3,101  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP operating income (loss)

   $ 1,059     $ (6,174   $ (4,491

Net loss

   $ (623   $ (10,824   $ (11,286

Amortization of acquired intangibles

     969       3,091       3,234  

Stock-based compensation expense

     376       1,522       3,101  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP net income (loss)

   $ 722     $ (6,211   $ (4,951

Components of Results of Operations

Revenue

We derive substantially all of our revenue from the sale of subscriptions to our critical communications and enterprise safety applications.

We generally bill and collect payment for our subscriptions annually in advance. All revenue billed in advance of services being delivered is recorded in deferred revenue. The initial subscription period typically ranges from one to three years. We offer varying levels of customer support based on customer needs and the complexity of their businesses, including the level of usage by a customer in terms of minutes or the amount of data used to transmit the notifications. Our pricing model is based on the number of applications subscribed to and, per application, the number of people, locations and things connected to our platform as well as the volume of communications. We also offer premium services including data feeds for social media, threat intelligence and weather. We generate additional revenue by expanding the number of premium features and applications that our customers subscribe to and the number of contacts connected to our platform.

 

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We generate an immaterial amount of revenue from set-up fees, which consist of participant process mapping, configuration, customer data migration and integration. We also sell professional services, which have been immaterial to date.

Cost of Revenue

Cost of revenue includes expenses related to the fulfillment of our subscription services, consisting primarily of employee-related expenses for data center operations and customer support, including salaries, bonuses, benefits and stock-based compensation expense. Cost of revenue also includes hosting costs, messaging costs and depreciation and amortization. As we add data center capacity and support personnel in advance of anticipated growth, our cost of revenue will increase and, if anticipated revenue growth does not occur, our gross profit will be adversely affected.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses consist of sales and marketing, research and development and general and administrative expenses. Salaries, bonuses, stock-based compensation expense and other personnel costs are the most significant components of each of these expense categories. We include stock-based compensation expense incurred in connection with the grant of stock options within the applicable operating expense category based on the equity award recipient’s functional area.

Sales and Marketing

Sales and marketing expense primarily consists of employee-related expenses for sales, marketing and public relations employees, including salaries, bonuses, commissions, benefits and stock-based compensation expense. Sales and marketing expense also includes trade show, market research, advertising and other related external marketing expense as well as office and software related costs to support sales. We defer certain sales commissions related to acquiring new customers and amortize these expenses ratably over the term of the corresponding subscription agreement. We plan to continue to expand our sales and marketing functions to grow our customer base and increase sales to existing customers. This growth will include adding sales personnel and expanding our marketing activities to continue to generate additional leads and build brand awareness. In the near term, we expect our sales and marketing expense to increase on an absolute dollar basis as we hire new sales representatives in the United States and worldwide and grow our marketing staff.

Research and Development

Research and development expense primarily consists of employee-related expenses for research and development staff, including salaries, bonuses, benefits and stock-based compensation expense. Research and development expense also includes the cost of certain third-party services, office related costs to support research and development activities, software subscriptions and hosting costs. We capitalize certain software development costs that are attributable to developing new applications and adding incremental functionality to our platform and amortize these costs over the estimated life of the new application or incremental functionality, which is generally three years. We focus our research and development efforts on improving our applications, developing new applications and delivering new functionality. In the near term, we expect our research and development expense to increase on an absolute dollar basis as we continue to increase the functionality of our platform and applications.

General and Administrative

General and administrative expense primarily consists of employee-related expenses for administrative, legal, finance and human resource personnel, including salaries, bonuses, benefits and stock-based compensation expense. General and administrative expense also includes professional fees, insurance premiums, corporate expenses, transaction-related costs, office-related expenses, facility costs, depreciation and amortization and software license costs. In the near term, we expect our general and administrative expense to increase on an absolute dollar basis as we incur the costs associated with being a publicly traded company.

 

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Interest Income

Interest income consists of interest earned on our cash balances held at financial institutions.

Interest Expense

Interest expense consists of interest on our outstanding debt obligations and interest on our capital leases.

Other Expenses, Net

Other expenses, net consists primarily of realized foreign currency gains and losses.

Results of Operations

The following tables set forth our results of operations for the periods presented and as a percentage of our total revenue for those periods. The period-to-period comparison of our historical results is not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
           2014                 2015                 2016        
     (in thousands)  

Revenue

   $ 42,421     $ 58,720     $ 76,846  

Cost of revenue(1)

     12,089       19,789       23,767  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     30,332       38,931       53,079  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

      

Sales and marketing(1)

     15,818       25,925       34,847  

Research and development(1)

     7,365       11,521       14,765  

General and administrative(1)

     7,435       12,272       14,293  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     30,618       49,718       63,905  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

     (286     (10,787     (10,826

Other expenses, net

     (426     (599     (484
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

     (712     (11,386     (11,310

Benefit from income taxes

     89       562       24  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

   $ (623   $ (10,824   $ (11,286
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Includes stock-based compensation expense and depreciation and amortization as follows:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Stock-based compensation expense:

        

Cost of revenue

   $ 82      $ 150      $ 180  

Sales and marketing

     120        315        725  

Research and development

     147        297        348  

General and administrative

     27        760        1,848  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 376      $ 1,522      $ 3,101  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

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     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014              2015              2016      
     (in thousands)  

Depreciation and Amortization expense:

        

Cost of revenue

   $ 1,615      $ 4,457      $ 6,247  

Sales and marketing

     101        227        208  

Research and development

     31        134        265  

General and administrative

     765        1,158      $ 1,022  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2,512      $ 5,976        7,742  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
         2014             2015             2016      

Consolidated Statements of Operations, as a percentage of revenue(1)

      

Revenue

     100     100     100

Cost of revenue

     28     34     31
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

     72     66     69
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

      

Sales and marketing

     37     44     45

Research and development

     17     20     19

General and administrative

     18     21     19
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

     72     85     83
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

           (18 )%      (14 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other expenses, net

     (1 )%      (1 )%      (1 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before income taxes

     (1 )%      (19 )%      (15 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Benefit from income taxes

     *       1     *  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

     (1 )%      (18 )%      (15 )% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1) Columns may not add up to 100% due to rounding.
  * Represents less than 0.5% of revenue.

Year Ended December 31, 2016 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2015

Revenue

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
     Change  
           2015                  2016                  $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenue

   $ 58,720      $ 76,846      $ 18,126        30.9

Revenue increased by $18.1 million in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was primarily due to an $18.1 million increase in sales of our solutions driven by expansion of our customer base from 2,662 customers as of December 31, 2015 to 3,205 as of December 31, 2016, including increased sales to larger organizations with greater numbers of contacts and locations.

Cost of Revenue

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cost of revenue

   $ 19,789     $ 23,767     $ 3,978        20.1

Gross margin %

     66     69     

 

 

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Cost of revenue increased by $4.0 million in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was primarily due to a $1.5 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 90 employees as of December 31, 2015 to 98 employees as of December 31, 2016. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $1.8 million increase in depreciation and amortization expense attributable to our acquired intangible assets, a $0.9 million increase in hosting and messaging costs, offset by a $0.2 million decrease in office related expenses.

Gross margin percentage increased due to our continued investment in personnel to support our growth in revenue, which was greater than our growth in expenses.

Operating Expenses

Sales and Marketing Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Sales and marketing

   $ 25,925     $ 34,847     $ 8,922        34.4

% of revenue

     44     45     

Sales and marketing expense increased by $8.9 million in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was primarily due to an $8.2 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 157 employees as of December 31, 2015 to 182 employees as of December 31, 2016. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $0.5 million increase in trade show and advertising costs and a $0.2 million increase in software costs to support our sales organization.

Research and Development Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Research and development

   $ 11,521     $ 14,765     $ 3,244        28.2

% of revenue

     20     19     

Research and development expense increased by $3.2 million in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was primarily due to a $2.7 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 109 employees as of December 31, 2015 to 123 employees as of December 31, 2016. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $0.6 million increase for the use of outside consultants and a $0.5 million increase in hosting and software related cost to support research and development activities. A total of $5.5 million of internally-developed software costs during 2016 and $4.8 million of internally-developed software costs during 2015 were capitalized, resulting in a decrease of the expense by $0.7 million in 2016.

General and Administrative Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

General and administrative

   $ 12,272     $ 14,293     $ 2,021        16.5

% of revenue

     21     19     

General and administrative expense increased by $2.0 million in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was primarily due to a $2.0 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from

 

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62 employees as of December 31, 2015 to 64 employees as of December 31, 2016. There was an additional increase of $0.4 million to support our operations and our preparations to become a public company. These increases were offset by a $0.6 million decrease in professional fees due to a decrease in legal, accounting and audit services in 2016.

Other Expense, Net

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Other expense, net

   $ 599     $ 484     $ (115)        (19.2)

% of revenue

     1     1     

Other expense, net decreased by $0.1 million in 2016 compared to 2015 as a result of a decrease in interest expense related to interest expense due under our term loan and revolving line of credit, which were paid off in September 2016 with the proceeds of our IPO.

Income Taxes

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2015                 2016                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Benefit from income taxes

   $ (562)     $ (24)     $ 538        (95.7)

% of revenue

     1     0     

Benefit from income taxes decreased by $0.5 million in 2016 compared to 2015 due to the placement of a full valuation allowance on our foreign deferred taxes.

Year Ended December 31, 2015 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2014

Revenue

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
     Change  
           2014                  2015                  $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenue

   $ 42,421      $ 58,720      $ 16,299        38.4

Revenue increased by $16.3 million in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was primarily due to a $14.0 million increase in sales of our solutions driven by expansion of our customer base from 2,167 customers as of December 31, 2014 to 2,662 as of December 31, 2015, including increased sales to larger organizations with greater numbers of contacts and locations. In 2015, we also had a $2.3 million increase in revenue attributable to the acquisition of Nixle, which occurred in December 2014.

Cost of Revenue

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cost of revenue

   $ 12,089     $ 19,789     $ 7,700        63.7

Gross margin %

     72     66     

 

 

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Cost of revenue increased by $7.7 million in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was primarily due to a $2.7 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 72 employees as of December 31, 2014 to 90 employees as of December 31, 2015. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $2.8 million increase in depreciation and amortization expense attributable to our acquired intangible assets, a $1.8 million increase in hosting and messaging costs and a $0.3 million increase in office related expenses.

Gross margin percentage decreased due to an increase in amortization of acquired intangible assets and capitalized software, as well as our continued investment in personnel to support our growth.

Operating Expenses

Sales and Marketing Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Sales and marketing

   $ 15,818     $ 25,925     $ 10,107        63.9

% of revenue

     37     44     

Sales and marketing expense increased by $10.1 million in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was primarily due to an $8.1 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 104 employees as of December 31, 2014 to 157 employees as of December 31, 2015. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $1.1 million increase in trade show and advertising costs and a $0.9 million increase in office related costs to support sales.

Research and Development Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Research and development

   $ 7,365     $ 11,521     $ 4,156        56.4

% of revenue

     17     20     

Research and development expense increased by $4.2 million in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was primarily due to a $6.5 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 83 employees as of December 31, 2014 to 109 employees as of December 31, 2015. The remaining increase was principally the result of a $0.9 million increase in office and software related cost to support research and development activities. A total of $4.8 million of internally-developed software costs during 2015 and $1.6 million of internally-developed software costs during 2014 were capitalized, resulting in a reduction of the expense by $3.2 million in 2015.

General and Administrative Expense

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

General and administrative

   $ 7,435     $ 12,272     $ 4,837        65.1

% of revenue

     18     21     

 

 

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General and administrative expense increased by $4.8 million in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was primarily due to a $2.5 million increase in employee-related costs associated with our increased headcount from 44 employees as of December 31, 2014 to 62 employees as of December 31, 2015. The remaining increase was the result of a $1.7 million increase in professional fees due to increased legal, accounting and audit services to support our operations and our preparations to become a public company, a $0.4 million increase in office related expenses and a $0.4 million increase in depreciation and amortization expense related to equipment. These increases were offset by a $0.2 million decrease in legal and transaction-related costs in 2015.

Other Expense, Net

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Other expense, net

   $ 426     $ 599     $ 173        40.6

% of revenue

     1     1     

Other expense, net increased by $0.2 million in 2015 compared to 2014 as a result of increased interest expense related to accretion of interest on our notes payable, interest expense due under our term loan and revolving line of credit.

Income Taxes

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
    Change  
           2014                 2015                 $                  %        
     (dollars in thousands)  

Benefit from income taxes

   $ (89)     $ (562)     $ (473)        531.5

% of revenue

     0     1     

Benefit from income taxes increased by $0.5 million in 2015 compared to 2014 due to our increased operations in foreign jurisdictions where we are subject to income taxes on profits which have benefited from current losses.

Quarterly Results of Operations

The following table sets forth our unaudited quarterly consolidated statements of operations data for each of the eight quarters in the period ended December 31, 2016. We have prepared the quarterly financial data on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus. In our opinion, the quarterly financial data reflects all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, which we consider necessary for a fair presentation of this data. This quarterly financial data should be read in conjunction with our

 

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consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future.

 

    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,
2015
    June 30,
2015
    September 30,
2015
    December 31,
2015
    March 31,
2016
    June 30,
2016
    September 30,
2016
    December 31,
2016
 
    (in thousands)  

Consolidated Statements of Operations Data:

               

Revenue

  $ 13,160     $ 14,153     $ 15,187     $ 16,220     $ 17,069     $ 18,565     $ 19,932     $ 21,280  

Cost of revenue

    4,126       4,919       5,165       5,579       5,475       5,676       6,173       6,443  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross Profit

    9,034       9,234       10,022       10,641       11,594       12,889       13,759       14,837  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses:

               

Sales and marketing

    5,512       5,825       6,761       7,827       8,205       8,849       8,605       9,188  

Research and development

    2,687       2,782       3,025       3,027       3,180       3,463       3,917       4,205  

General and administrative

    2,041       2,537       3,863       3,831       3,458       3,128       3,666       4,041  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total operating expense

    10,240       11,144       13,649       14,685       14,843       15,440       16,188       17,434  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating loss

    (1,206     (1,910     (3,627     (4,044     (3,249     (2,551     (2,429     (2,597

Other income (expense),net

    (131     (145     (180     (143     (131     (208     (165     20  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss before (provision for) benefit from income taxes

    (1,337     (2,055     (3,807     (4,187     (3,380     (2,759     (2,594     (2,577

(Provision for) benefit from income taxes

    (24     212       186       188       155       (45     (35     (51
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss

  $ (1,361   $ (1,843   $ (3,621   $ (3,999   $ (3,225   $ (2,804   $ (2,629   $ (2,628
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other Metrics:

               

Adjusted EBITDA(1)

  $ (151   $ (110   $ (1,391   $ (1,699   $ (779   $ 58     $ 334     $ 392  

 

  (1) Adjusted EBITDA represents our net loss before interest income and interest expense, income tax expense and benefit, depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. We do not consider these items to be indicative of our core operating performance. The items that are non-cash include depreciation and amortization expense and stock-based compensation expense. Adjusted EBITDA is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our core operating performance and trends and to generate future operating plans, make strategic decisions regarding the allocation of capital and invest in initiatives that are focused on cultivating new markets for our solutions. In particular, the exclusion of certain expenses in calculating adjusted EBITDA facilitates comparisons of our operating performance on a period-to-period basis. Adjusted EBITDA is not a measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. The following table presents a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA to net loss, the most directly comparable GAAP measure, for each of the periods indicated. See “Management’s Discussion & Analysis of Financial Conditions and Results of Operations—Other Metrics” for a discussion of the limitations of adjusted EBITDA.

 

    Three Months Ended  
    March 31,
2015
    June 30,
2015
    September 30,
2015
    December 31,
2015
    March 31,
2016
    June 30,
2016
    September 30,
2016
    December 31,
2016
 
    (in thousands)  

Net loss

  $ (1,361   $ (1,843   $ (3,621   $ (3,999   $ (3,225   $ (2,804   $ (2,629   $ (2,628

Interest expense, net

    105       139       159       134       137       174       195       (34

Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

    24       (212     (186     (188     (155     45       35       51  

Depreciation and amortization expense

    935       1,594       1,715       1,732       1,793       1,908       1,974       2,067  

Stock-based compensation expense

    146       212       542       622       671       735       759       936  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total net adjustments

  $ 1,210     $ 1,733     $ 2,230     $ 2,300     $ 2,446     $ 2,862     $ 2,963     $ 3,020  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Adjusted EBITDA

  $ (151   $ (110   $ (1,391   $ (1,699   $ (779   $ 58     $ 334     $ 392  
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Quarterly Trends in Revenue and Gross Margin

The sequential increases in our quarterly revenue was due primarily to increases in our number of new customers as well as increased revenue from existing customers as they expanded their use of our solutions.

Our gross profit has increased sequentially for the periods presented due primarily to greater growth in revenue than expenses, which expenses are primarily related to our increase in headcount as we invest in the growth of our business. This increase in revenue was partially offset by increases in amortization expense attributed to our acquisitions and capitalized software development costs.

Quarterly Trends in Operating Expenses

Our operating expenses generally have increased sequentially for the periods presented due primarily to increases in headcount and other related expenses to support our growth and becoming a public company. We anticipate our operating expenses will continue to increase in absolute dollar terms as we invest in the long-term growth of our business.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

To date, we have financed our operations primarily through cash from operating activities, along with equity issuances and debt financing arrangements. Our principal source of liquidity is cash and cash equivalents totaling $60.8 million as of December 31, 2016, which includes the remaining net proceeds from our initial public offering completed in September 2016. We received net proceeds of $66.1 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and offering expenses paid or payable by us. We have generated significant losses since inception and expect to continue to generate losses for the foreseeable future.

We believe that our cash balances, our available borrowings under our revolving line of credit and the cash flows generated by our operations will be sufficient to satisfy our anticipated cash needs for working capital and capital expenditures for at least the next 12 months. However, our belief may prove to be incorrect, and we could utilize our available financial resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future capital requirements and the adequacy of available funds will depend on many factors, including those set forth in the section of this prospectus titled “Risk Factors.” We cannot assure you that we will be able to raise additional capital on acceptable terms or at all. In addition, if we fail to meet our operating plan during the next 12 months, our liquidity could be adversely affected.

Cash Flows

The following table shows a summary of our cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2015 and 2016:

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
 
         2014             2015             2016      
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

   $ 3,040     $ 4,412     $ 8,578  

Cash provided by operating activities

     7,716       4,451       9,503  

Cash used in investing activities

     (4,136     (7,404     (9,020

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities

     (2,120     7,219       51,470  

Effects of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents

     (88     (100     234  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 4,412     $ 8,578     $ 60,765  
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

At December 31, 2016, $1.5 million of the $60.8 million of cash and cash equivalents was held by foreign subsidiaries. Our intention is to indefinitely reinvest foreign earnings in our foreign subsidiaries. If these earnings were used to fund domestic operations, they would be subject to additional income taxes upon repatriation.

 

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Sources of Funds

Initial Public Offering

On September 21, 2016, we closed our initial public offering in which we issued and sold 6,250,000 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $12.00 per share for net proceeds of approximately $66.1 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and offering expenses paid or payable by us.

Credit Facility

In June 2015, we entered into a loan and security agreement with Western Alliance Bank (formerly known as Bridge Bank) to provide a secured revolving line of credit that allows us to borrow up to $10.0 million for working capital and general business requirements. In February 2016, we entered into an amendment of our loan and security agreement with Western Alliance Bank to (1) increase the capacity of our revolving line of credit by $5.0 million to $15.0 million and (2) set the minimum prime rate based on which interest due is calculated at 3.25%. No other changes were made to the loan and security agreement. The loan and security agreement, as amended, allows us to borrow up to $15.0 million for working capital and general business requirements. Amounts outstanding under the line of credit bear interest at the prime rate plus 0.75% with accrued interest payable on a monthly basis and outstanding and unpaid principal due upon maturity of the credit facility in June 2018. As of December 31, 2016, the total amount available to be borrowed by us was $15.0 million and we had no outstanding balance on the revolving line of credit.

Western Alliance Bank maintains a security interest in substantially all of our tangible and intangible assets, excluding intellectual property, to secure any outstanding amounts under the loan agreement. The loan agreement contains customary events of default, conditions to borrowing and covenants, including restrictions on our ability to dispose of assets, make acquisitions, incur debt, incur liens and make distributions and dividends to stockholders. The loan agreement also includes a financial covenant related to our recurring revenue renewal rate. During the continuance of an event of default, Western Alliance Bank may accelerate amounts outstanding, terminate the credit facility and foreclose on the collateral.

Uses of Funds

Our historical uses of cash have primarily consisted of cash used for operating activities, such as expansion of our sales and marketing operations, research and development activities and other working capital needs.

Operating Activities

Our net loss and cash flows provided by operating activities are significantly influenced by our investments in headcount and infrastructure to support our growth, marketing and sponsorship expenses, and our ability to bill and collect in a timely manner. Our net loss has been significantly greater than our use of cash for operating activities due to the inclusion of non-cash expenses and charges.

Operating activities provided $9.5 million in 2016, primarily from $9.6 million in cash provided as a result of changes in operating assets and liabilities, which was increased by $11.2 million of non-cash operating expenses and partially offset by our net loss of $11.3 million. Specifically, we recognized non-cash charges aggregating $7.7 million for depreciation and amortization of intangible assets, capitalized software development costs and property and equipment, $3.1 million for stock-based compensation expense, $0.4 million for the increase in our accounts receivable provision and $0.1 million related to non-cash interest on notes payable, offset by a $0.1 million decrease in our deferred income taxes. The change in operating assets and liabilities reflected a $12.0 million increase in deferred revenue, a $1.3 million increase in accrued employee-related expenses due to timing of payments, and a $0.5 million increase in accrued expenses due to timing of payments made to vendors. These increases were partially offset by a $2.3 million increase in accounts receivable, a $1.1 million increase in other assets due to timing of payments made for deferred IPO cost and commissions, a $0.4 million decrease in accounts payable due to the timing of payments made and a $0.3 million increase in prepaid expenses as a result of the increase in upfront payments made for insurance services.

 

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Operating activities provided $4.5 million in 2015, primarily from $7.7 million in cash provided as a result of changes in operating assets and liabilities, which was increased by $7.5 million of non-cash operating expenses and partially offset by our net loss of $10.8 million. Specifically, we recognized non-cash charges aggregating $6.0 million for depreciation and amortization of intangible assets, capitalized software development costs and property and equipment, $1.5 million for stock-based compensation expense, $0.4 million for the increase in our accounts receivable provision and $0.1 million related to non-cash interest on notes payable, offset by a $0.4 million decrease in our deferred income taxes. The change in operating assets and liabilities reflected an $11.6 million increase in deferred revenue, a $1.2 million increase in accrued employee-related expenses due to timing of payments and a $0.9 million increase in accounts payable due to timing of payments made to vendors. These increases were partially offset by a $4.8 million increase in accounts receivable, a $0.7 million increase in prepaid expenses as a result of the increase in upfront payments made for insurance services, a $0.4 million increase in other assets due to timing of payments made for deferred IPO cost and commissions and a $0.2 million decrease in accrued expenses due to the timing of payments made.

Investing Activities

Our investing activities consist primarily of capital expenditures for capitalized software development costs and property and equipment purchases.

Investing activities used $9.0 million in 2016, primarily from net cash paid in acquisitions of $2.3 million, and our investment in software development of $5.5 million and property and equipment of $1.0 million.

Investing activities used $7.4 million in cash in 2015, primarily from our investment in software development of $4.9 million and property and equipment of $2.5 million.

Financing Activities

Cash generated by financing activities includes proceeds from our initial public offering, borrowings under our term loan and credit facilities and proceeds from the issuance of common stock upon the exercise of employee stock options. Cash used in financing activities includes deferred initial public offering costs and payments on capital leases, notes payable and repayments of debt under our credit facilities.

Financing activities provided $51.5 million of cash in 2016, which reflects proceeds of $67.8 million from our initial public offering, net of underwriter’s discount and commissions, $0.8 million from the exercise of stock options and proceeds from our line of credit of $9.5 million. These amounts were offset by a $19.5 million payment on our line of credit, a $5.0 million payment on our term loan and a $2.0 million payment on notes payable related to the Vocal Limited acquisition.

Financing activities provided $7.2 million in cash in 2015, primarily from proceeds from our term loan of $5.0 million and proceeds from our line of credit of $12.0 million, partially offset by a $1.5 million payment to repurchase outstanding shares of our common stock, $5.0 million in payments on our line of credit, $1.8 million in payments on notes payable, $1.4 million in payments attributed to deferred initial public offering costs and $0.1 million in payments on capital leases.

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

The following table summarizes our commitments to settle contractual obligations as of December 31, 2016:

 

     Less than
1 Year
     1 to 3
    Years    
     3 to 5
    Years    
     More than
5 Years
         Total      
     (in thousands)  

Operating Leases(1)

   $ 1,828      $ 3,514      $ 3,335      $ 705      $ 9,382  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,828      $ 3,514      $ 3,335      $ 705      $ 9,382  
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  (1)  Operating leases include total future minimum rent payments under non-cancelable operating lease agreements as described in note (18) of our consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus.

 

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Future minimum operating lease payments have been reduced by future minimum sublease income of $0.2 million.

In December 2016, we entered into a new lease for our executive offices in Burlington, Massachusetts that will increase our future minimum lease commitments over the next five years by $8.0 million.

The above table does not include any payments we may have to make under the contingent liability related to the Crisis Commander and IDV acquisitions, as the amount of the ultimate payments are unknown. Please see notes 5 and 19 to our consolidated financial statements for more information.

The commitment amounts in the table above are associated with contracts that are enforceable and legally binding and that specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum services to be used, fixed, minimum or variable price provisions and the approximate timing of the actions under the contracts. The table does not include obligations under agreements that we can cancel without a significant penalty.

Backlog

We sell all of our critical communications applications on a subscription basis. We generally enter into contracts that range from one to three years in length, with an average contract duration of 2.0 years as of December 31, 2016, and generally bill and collect payment annually in advance. Since we bill many of our customers at the beginning of each contract year, there can be amounts that we have not yet been contractually able to invoice. Until such time as these amounts are invoiced, they are not recorded in revenue, deferred revenue or elsewhere in our consolidated financial statements. As of December 31, 2016, the dollar amount of this backlog believed to be firm was $39.3 million. We expect that the amount of backlog relative to the total value of our subscription agreements will change from year to year for several reasons, including the specific timing and duration of customer agreements, varying invoicing cycles of agreements, the specific timing of customer renewals and changes in customer financial circumstances. In addition, because revenue for any period is a function of revenue recognized from deferred revenue under contracts in existence at the beginning of the period, as well as contracts that are renewed and new customer contracts that are entered into during the period, backlog at the beginning of any period is not necessarily indicative of future performance. Our presentation of backlog may also differ from that of other companies in our industry. Due to these factors, as well as variances in billing arrangements with customers, we do not utilize backlog as a key management metric internally.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, including entities sometimes referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities that were established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. We do not engage in off-balance sheet financing arrangements. In addition, we do not engage in trading activities involving non-exchange traded contracts.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements require us to make estimates, assumptions and judgments that affect the reported amounts of revenue, assets, liabilities, costs and expenses. We base our estimates and assumptions on historical experience and other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. We evaluate our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Our actual results may differ from these estimates. Our most critical accounting policies are summarized below. See note 2 to our consolidated financial statements beginning on page F-5 of this prospectus for a description of our other significant accounting policies.

Revenue Recognition

We derive substantially all of our revenue from contract subscription fees for use of our applications.

 

 

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We recognize revenue in accordance with ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition, with respect to a transaction when all of the following conditions have been satisfied:

 

    persuasive evidence of an agreement exists;

 

    the service has been provided to the customer;

 

    fees are fixed or determinable; and

 

    the collection of the fees is reasonably assured and acceptance criteria, if any, have been met.

If any of these criteria are not met, revenue recognition is deferred until such time that all of the criteria are met.

Our subscription arrangements do not provide customers with the right to take possession of our software at any time.

Subscription Revenue

We recognize subscription revenue ratably over the initial subscription period committed by the customer commencing when the customer’s environment has been created in our hosted environment. The initial subscription period is typically one to three years and the level of service provided each customer varies based on the level of service required by the complexity of a customer’s business.

Other Revenue

We recognize revenue for set-up fees, which historically have not been material to our financial statements. We have concluded that set-up fees do not meet the criteria for separation from our primary service as they do not have stand-alone value as we have historically not sold set-up fees separately. We charge set-up fees for substantially all new applications and services. These set-up fees are recognized ratably over the contractual period, which approximates the life of the application. We also sell professional services, which have been immaterial to date.

Deferred Revenue

Deferred revenue includes amounts collected or billed in excess of recognizable revenue. Such amounts are recognized by us over the life of the contract upon meeting the revenue recognition criteria. Deferred revenue that will be recognized during the succeeding 12-month period is recorded as current deferred revenue and the remaining portion is recorded as non-current deferred revenue. Because the mix of billing terms with customers can vary from period to period, the annualized value of the contracts that we enter into with our customers will not be completely reflected in deferred revenue at any single point in time.

Business Combinations

The results of businesses acquired in a business combination are included in our consolidated financial statements from the date of the acquisition. Purchase accounting results in assets and liabilities of an acquired business being recorded at their estimated fair values on the acquisition date. Any excess consideration over the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed is recognized as goodwill.

We perform valuations of assets acquired and liabilities assumed on each acquisition accounted for as a business combination and allocate the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on our best estimate of fair value. We determine the appropriate useful life of intangible assets by performing an analysis of cash flows based on historical experience of the acquired businesses. Intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives based on the pattern in which the economic benefits associated with the asset are expected to be consumed, which to date has approximated the straight-line method of amortization.

 

 

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Transaction costs associated with business combinations are expensed as incurred and are included in general and administrative expense in our consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

Goodwill

Goodwill represents the excess of the aggregate purchase price paid over the fair value of the net assets acquired in our business combinations. Goodwill is not amortized and is tested for impairment at least annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Events or changes in circumstances that could trigger an impairment review include a significant adverse change in business climate, an adverse action or assessment by a regulator, unanticipated competition, a loss of key personnel, significant changes in the manner of our use of the acquired assets or the strategy for our overall business, significant negative industry or economic trends, or significant underperformance relative to expected historical or projected future results of operations.

We have the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value, including goodwill. If, after assessing the totality of events or circumstances, we determine that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, additional impairment testing is not required. However, if we conclude otherwise, we are required to perform the first step of a two-step impairment test. Alternatively, we may elect to proceed directly to the first step of the two-step impairment test and bypass the qualitative assessment.

The first step of the impairment test involves comparing the estimated fair value of a reporting unit with its book value, including goodwill. If the estimated fair value exceeds book value, goodwill is considered not to be impaired and no additional steps are necessary. If, however, the fair value of the reporting unit is less than book value, the carrying amount of the goodwill is compared to its implied fair value. The estimate of implied fair value of goodwill may require valuations of certain internally generated and unrecognized intangible assets. If the carrying amount of goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to the excess. We test for goodwill impairment on November 30 of each year.

Software Development Costs

We capitalize the costs of software developed or obtained for internal use in accordance with ASC Topic 350-40, Internal Use Software. Capitalized software development costs consist of costs incurred during the application development stage and include purchased software licenses, implementation costs, consulting costs, and payroll-related costs for projects that qualify for capitalization. These costs relate to major new functionality. All other costs, primarily related to maintenance and minor software fixes, are expensed as incurred.

Stock-Based Compensation

We recognize stock-based compensation expense for stock-based compensation awards granted to our employees, directors, consultants and other service providers that can be settled in shares of our common stock. Compensation expense for stock-based compensation awards granted is based on the grant date fair value estimate for each award as determined by our board of directors or the compensation committee of our board of directors. We recognize these compensation costs on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award, which is generally four years. As stock-based compensation expense recognized is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, such expense is reduced for estimated forfeitures.

We estimate the fair value of stock-based compensation awards at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, which was developed for use in estimating the value of traded options that have no vesting restrictions and are freely transferable. The fair values generated by the model may not be indicative of the actual fair values of our awards as it does not consider other factors important to those stock-based payment awards, such as continued employment, periodic vesting requirements and limited transferability.

 

 

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Determining the fair value of stock-based awards at the grant date requires judgment. We use the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the fair value of stock options. The determination of the grant date fair value of options using an option-pricing model is affected by our estimated common stock fair value as well as assumptions regarding a number of other complex and subjective variables. These variables include the fair value of our common stock, the expected term of the options, our expected stock price volatility, risk-free interest rates, and expected dividends, which are estimated as follows:

 

    Fair value of our common stock.    Prior to our initial public offering, the fair value of our common stock was determined by the estimated fair value at the time of grant. For stock options granted subsequent to our initial public offering, the fair value of common stock is based on the closing market price of our common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market on the date of grant.

 

    Expected term.    The expected term represents the period that the stock-based compensation awards are expected to be outstanding. Since we did not have sufficient historical information to develop reasonable expectations about future exercise behavior, we use the simplified method to compute expected term, which represents the average of the time-to-vesting and the contractual life.

 

    Expected volatility.    As we have a limited trading history for our common stock, the expected stock price volatility for our common stock is estimated by taking the average historic price volatility for industry peers based on daily price observations over a period equivalent to the expected term of the stock option grants. We do not rely on implied volatilities of traded options in our industry peers’ common stock because the volume of activity was relatively low. We intend to continue to consistently apply this process using the same or similar public companies until a sufficient amount of historical information regarding the volatility of our own common stock share price becomes available.

 

    Risk-free interest rate.    The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant for zero coupon U.S. Treasury notes with maturities approximately equal to the expected term of the options.

 

    Expected dividend yield.    We have never declared or paid any cash dividends and do not presently plan to declare or pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Consequently, we used an expected dividend yield of zero.

If any of the assumptions used in the Black-Scholes model change significantly, stock-based compensation for future awards may differ materially compared with the awards granted previously.

The following table presents the weighted-average assumptions used to estimate the fair value of options granted during the periods presented:

 

     Year Ended
December 31,
 
         2014              2015              2016      

Employee Stock Options:

        

Expected term (in years)

     5.89 - 6.13        5.09 - 6.15        5.29 - 6.11  

Expected volatility

     51.7% - 69%        60%        60% - 70%  

Risk-free interest rate

     1.63% - 2.06%        1.41% - 1.94%        1.21% - 2.55%  

Dividend rate

     0%        0%        0%  

Historically, for all periods prior to the completion of our initial public offering, the fair value of the common stock underlying our stock options was determined by our board of directors, which intended that all options granted have an exercise price that is not less than the estimated fair market value of a share of our common stock underlying those options on the date of grant. The valuations of our common stock were determined in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Practice Aid, Valuation of Privately-Held-Company Equity Securities Issued as Compensation. The assumptions we used in the valuation model were based on future expectations combined with management judgment. In the absence of a

 

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public trading market, our board of directors, with input from management, exercised significant judgment and considered numerous objective and subjective factors to determine the fair market value of our common stock as of the date of each option grant, including the following factors:

 

    contemporaneous third-party valuations performed at periodic intervals by a valuation firm;

 

    the prices, rights, preferences and privileges of our preferred stock relative to the common stock;

 

    the purchases of shares of preferred stock by unaffiliated venture capital firms;

 

    actual operating and financial performance and forecasts;

 

    present value of forecasted future cash flows;

 

    the likelihood of achieving a liquidity event, such as an initial public offering or a sale of our company given prevailing market conditions;

 

    any adjustment necessary to recognize a lack of marketability for our common stock;

 

    the market performance of comparable publicly-traded technology companies;

 

    the U.S. and global capital market conditions;

 

    our stage of development; and

 

    industry information such as market size and growth and our competitive position in the market.

Following the closing of our initial public offering, the fair value of our common stock is determined based on the closing price of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Market.

The aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding as of December 31, 2016 was $15.9 million, of which $9.4 million related to vested options and $6.5 million related to unvested options.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In January 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, 2017-04, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. This guidance eliminates Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test, instead requiring an entity to recognize a goodwill impairment charge for the amount by which the goodwill carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value. This guidance is effective for interim and annual goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance must be applied on a prospective basis. We expect to adopt this guidance for interim and annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business. This guidance narrows the definition of a business. This standard provides guidance to assist entities with evaluating when a set of transferred assets and activities is a business. This guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, and early adoption is permitted. This guidance must be applied prospectively to transactions occurring within the period of adoption. We expect to adopt this guidance effective January 1, 2018. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Restricted Cash. This guidance requires that a statement of cash flows explain the change during the period in the total of cash, cash

 

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equivalents, and restricted cash. As a result, restricted cash will be included with cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, and the new guidance is to be applied retrospectively. We not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our cash flows.

In September 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments. This guidance clarifies the presentation requirements of eight specific issues within the statement of cash flows. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a significant impact on our financial statements, as our treatment of the relevant affected items within its consolidated statement of cash flows is consistent with the requirements of this guidance.

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. This standard is intended to simplify several areas of accounting for share-based compensation arrangements, including the income tax impact, classification on the statement of cash flows and forfeitures. ASU 2016-09 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016, and early adoption is permitted. The ASU will be effective for us in the first quarter of 2017. We do not expect this ASU to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In February, 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases. The standard will affect all entities that lease assets and will require lessees to recognize a lease liability and a right-of-use asset for all leases (except for short-term leases that have a duration of less than one year) as of the date on which the lessor makes the underlying asset available to the lessee. For public companies, the new standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. For leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements, lessees and lessors must apply a modified retrospective transition approach. We are still evaluating the effect that this guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-03, Interest—Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs. The new standard requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability. The new standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2015. We adopted this standard retrospectively in the first quarter of 2016. The balance sheet as of December 31, 2015 was retrospectively adjusted, which resulted in reductions to other assets of $0.1 million and long-term debt of $0.1 million.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which amends the existing accounting standards for revenue recognition. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of the Effective Date, which delays the effective date of ASU 2014-09 by one year. The FASB also agreed to allow entities to choose to adopt the standard as of the original effective date. In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net) which clarifies the implementation guidance on principal versus agent considerations. The guidance includes indicators to assist an entity in determining whether it controls a specified good or service before it is transferred to the customers. The new revenue recognition standard will be effective for us in the first quarter of 2018, with the option to adopt it in the first quarter of 2017. We currently anticipate adopting the new standard effective January 1, 2018. The new standard also permits two methods of adoption: retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented (full retrospective method), or retrospectively with the cumulative effect of initially applying the guidance recognized at the date of initial application (the modified retrospective method). We currently anticipate adopting the standard using the modified retrospective method. We are still in the process of completing our analysis on the impact this guidance will have on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

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Qualitative and Quantitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Market risk represents the risk of loss that may impact our financial position due to adverse changes in financial market prices and rates. Our market risk exposure is primarily the result of fluctuations in interest rates and foreign exchange rates as well as, to a lesser extent, inflation.

Interest Rate Risk

We are exposed to interest rate risk in the ordinary course of our business. Our cash equivalents includes cash in readily available checking and money market accounts and marketable securities. These securities are not dependent on interest rate fluctuations that may cause the principal amount of these assets to fluctuate.

We had cash and cash equivalents of $60.8 million as of December 31, 2016, which consisted of bank deposits and money market funds. To date, fluctuations in interest income have not been significant. We have no outstanding debt subject to interest rate risk as of December 31, 2016. Amounts outstanding under our revolving line of credit carry a variable interest rate of the prime rate, but in no event less than 3.25%, plus 0.75%. As of December 31, 2016, the applicable prime rate was 3.75%. We monitor our cost of borrowing under our revolving line of credit, if any, taking into account our funding requirements, and our expectation for short-term rates in the future.

We do not enter into investments for trading or speculative purposes and have not used any derivative financial instruments to manage our interest rate risk exposure. Although our credit facility and term loan have variable interest rates, a hypothetical 10% change in interest rates during any of the periods presented would not have had a material impact on our financial statements.

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

We have foreign currency risks related to our revenue and operating expenses denominated in currencies other than our functional currency, the U.S. dollar, principally British pounds. Movements in foreign currencies in which we transact business could significantly affect future net earnings. We do not currently engage in any hedging activity to reduce our potential exposure to currency fluctuations, although we may choose to do so in the future. A hypothetical 10% change in foreign exchange rates during any of the periods presented would not have had a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. As our international operations grow, we will continue to reassess our approach to manage our risk relating to fluctuations in foreign currency rate.

Inflation Risk

We do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. If our costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs through price increases. Our inability or failure to do so could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

JOBS Act Transition Period

In April 2012, the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, was enacted. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. Thus, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have irrevocably elected not to avail ourselves of this extended transition period and, as a result, we will adopt new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for other public companies.

We are in the process of evaluating the benefits of relying on other exemptions and reduced reporting requirements under the JOBS Act. Subject to certain conditions, as an emerging growth company, we may rely on certain of these exemptions, including without limitation, (i) providing an auditor’s attestation report on our

 

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system of internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and (ii) complying with any requirement that may be adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor’s report providing additional information about the audit and the financial statements, known as the auditor discussion and analysis. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier to occur of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenues of at least $1.0 billion or (c) in which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the prior June 30th, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

 

 

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BUSINESS

Overview

Everbridge is a global software company that provides enterprise software applications that automate and accelerate organizations’ operational response to critical events in order to keep people safe and businesses running. During public safety threats such as active shooter situations, terrorist attacks or severe weather conditions, as well as critical business events such as IT outages, cyber-attacks or other incidents such as product recalls or supply-chain interruptions, our SaaS-based platform enables our customers to quickly and reliably aggregate and assess threat data, locate people at risk and responders able to assist, automate the execution of pre-defined communications processes, and track progress on executing response plans. Our customers use our platform to identify and assess hundreds of different types of threats to their organizations, people, assets or brand. Our solutions enable organizations to deliver intelligent, contextual messages to, and receive verification of delivery from, hundreds or millions of recipients, across multiple communications modalities such as voice, SMS and e-mail. Our applications enable the delivery of messages in near real-time to more than 100 different communication devices, in over 200 countries and territories, in 15 languages and dialects – all simultaneously. We delivered 1.5 billion communications in 2016. We automate the process of sending contextual notifications to multiple constituencies and receiving return information on a person’s or operation’s status so that organizations can act quickly and precisely. Our Critical Event Management platform is comprised of a comprehensive set of software applications that address the full spectrum of tasks an organization has to perform to manage a critical event, including Mass Notification, Incident Management, Safety Connection, IT Alerting, Visual Command Center, Crisis Commander, Community Engagement and Secure Messaging. We believe that our broad suite of integrated, enterprise applications delivered via a single global platform is a significant competitive advantage in the market for Critical Event Management solutions, which we refer to generally as CEM.

In critical situations, the speed at which threats are assessed and information is transmitted and accessed is essential. For example, United States Department of Homeland Security research indicates that the average duration of an active shooter event at a school is approximately 12.5 minutes, while the average police response time to such events is 18 minutes. Accordingly, organizations must be able to aggregate multiple types of threat and incident data and determine whether their people, assets, or suppliers could be impacted, rapidly deliver messages that are tailored to multiple, specific audiences, in precise locations and be assured of delivery. Further, the proliferation of mobile and digital communications has resulted in individuals spending less time in a fixed office location, with International Data Corporation estimating that by 2020 mobile workers will account for 72% of the total United States workforce, and this trend has simultaneously increased the number of pathways through which people receive information. These developments have made it imperative that organizations be able to locate travelling or remote workers to determine who might be impacted by a critical event, and that critical communications be delivered via voice, SMS, and email, as well as to social media, outdoor signage and personal computers. Moreover, organizations require the ability to leverage all of these pathways, individually or in sequence, to reach people in situations where a certain means of communication may be inoperative or individuals are not responsive to a single pathway. During public safety threats and critical business events, the ability to gather, organize and analyze data in real time, and to enable secure, scalable, reliable and automated communications to people can be essential to saving lives, protecting assets and maintaining businesses. Further, the ability to rapidly organize a response by locating available responders and reducing the time required to manage them via automated communications can also result in significant economic savings, as each minute of unplanned downtime costs organizations an average of approximately $5,600, according to Gartner, Inc.

The severity, complexity and frequency of these critical events, their implications for business performance and personal safety, and regulatory and compliance challenges are increasing. The need for active shooter preparedness and public safety protection from terrorist attacks, as well managing the response to IT outages, cyber incidents, severe weather conditions, product recalls, supply-chain interruptions, hazardous material discharges and other urgent events, drive the need for a secure, scalable and reliable CEM system that can be operated quickly and easily. In addition, there has been a rapid proliferation of connected devices and networked

 

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physical objects – the Internet of Things, or IoT – that have the capability to communicate information about status and environment and generate data that enables individuals and enterprises to take appropriate action. These dynamics have led to a growing need for solutions that can deliver comprehensive yet targeted and contextually relevant content that facilitates the desired outcomes in critical situations and overcomes the information overload that individuals face. We estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, that the market for CEM solutions represented an $18.3 billion worldwide opportunity in 2015 and is expected to grow to $41.1 billion in 2020.

Following the tragic events of 9/11, Everbridge was founded with a vision of helping people communicate effectively in critical situations. Our SaaS-based CEM platform is built on a secure, scalable and reliable infrastructure with multiple layers of redundancy to enable the rapid delivery of critical communications, with near real-time verification, over numerous devices and contact paths. Our Mass Notification application is our most established application and enables enterprises and governmental entities to aggregate and assess threat data, locate people based on their standard work or home location and send and receive two-way, contextually aware notifications to individuals or groups to keep them informed before, during and after natural or man-made disasters and other emergencies. For example, during Hurricane Sandy, our Mass Notification application was used along the U.S. East Coast to deliver more than eight million communications. By automating the delivery of these types of critical communications, we enable customers to increase the speed and accuracy of their response and reduce associated costs. Importantly, given the pressure and anxiety most people experience in critical situations, our Mass Notification application provides a simple user interface and automated workflows for ease of use. The expertise that we garnered developing our Mass Notification application and our customers’ reliance on our solutions led us to leverage our platform to deploy solutions for CEM use cases. In turn, we have developed a full suite of enterprise-scale applications that enable our customers to inform and organize people during critical situations, whether a broad audience or a targeted subset of individuals, globally or locally, and accounting for cultural, linguistic, regulatory and technological differences. As all of our applications leverage our CEM platform, customers can use a single contacts database, rules engine of algorithms and hierarchies and user interface to accomplish multiple objectives. Our applications are easy-to-use, quickly deployable and require limited implementation services and no development resources.

The following situations reflect examples of how our applications aggregate and assess data and enable improved management of critical events:

 

    When an active shooter situation or terrorist attack occurs, organizations can quickly identify employees in the affected area, including employees not at their usual business location, in order to confirm that they are safe and provide tailored instructions. For example, shelter-in-place instructions may be provided to people in an impacted building while evacuation instructions are provided to those in an adjacent building. At the same time, first responders and hospitals can use multiple modes of alerting to mobilize resources and call in staff to provide emergency care.

 

    When a hurricane is imminent, local emergency management departments can alert affected communities with relevant safety and evacuation instructions while companies can put in place emergency plans to notify employees of office closures while coordinating work assignments to maintain the continuity of core operations.

 

    Companies can consolidate separate command centers for emergency operations and supply chain events, using one common data set to aggregate and assess data on severe weather, political unrest and other types of threats to their own and suppliers’ operations, thereby reducing costs while gaining efficiencies.

 

    When IT systems fail, IT administrators can shorten the time required to alert cross-department responders, use scheduling information to determine availability and quickly assemble appropriate personnel on a conference bridge, thereby reducing the costs incurred from downtime.

 

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    When a patient is suspected of having a stroke, an on-call specialist can provide a patient assessment via video communications during the ambulance trip and the emergency room can be readied for an immediate stroke treatment, accelerating critical time to treatment.

 

    When a cyber incident shuts down an IT network, management can alert employees of the network shutdown via a secure, alternate communication path.

 

    When a power line is down, utility workers can utilize pre-configured incident management templates to alert affected customers and responders and provide service updates.

 

    When engine readings in critical equipment detect a malfunction, technicians with the appropriate skills can be automatically alerted and quickly deployed to minimize downtime and avoid revenue loss or service interruption.

 

    When readings from an implanted medical device are abnormal, that information can be automatically routed to the individual’s healthcare provider to enable timely medical care.

 

    When a young child goes missing, local officials can send alerts to and receive tips from their communities to aid in locating and returning the child.

 

    When a financial services firm experiences disruptions in service, clients can be promptly notified and audit confirmations can be provided to document delivery.

Our customer base has grown from 867 customers at the end of 2011 to more than 3,200 customers as of December 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2016, our customers were based in 28 countries and included eight of the 10 largest U.S. cities, eight of the 10 largest U.S.-based investment banks, 24 of the 25 busiest North American airports, six of the 10 largest global consulting firms, six of the 10 largest global auto makers, all four of the largest global accounting firms, four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health care providers and four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health insurers. We provide products and services to customers of varying sizes, including enterprises, small businesses, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and government agencies. Our customers span a wide variety of industries including technology, energy, financial services, healthcare and life sciences, manufacturing, media and entertainment, retail, higher education and professional services.

We derive substantially all of our revenue from subscriptions to our critical communications applications, which represented 97%, 97% and 96% of our total revenue in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. Historically, we derived more than 86% of our revenue in each of the last three fiscal years from sales of our Mass Notification application. Our pricing model is based on the number of applications subscribed to and, per application, the number of people, locations and things connected to our platform, as well as the volume of communications. We also offer premium services including data feeds for social media, threat intelligence and weather. We generate additional revenue by expanding the number of applications, number of contacts and number of devices that our customers purchase over time.

Recent Developments

In September 2016, we closed our initial public offering, or IPO, in which we sold a total of 6,250,000 shares of our common stock. We received net cash proceeds of $66.1 million, net of underwriting discounts and commissions and other costs associated with the offering paid or payable by us.

In December 2016, we acquired 100% of the shares of Svensk Krisledning AB, or Crisis Commander. We acquired Crisis Commander for cash consideration of approximately $2.3 million with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $0.4 million. Crisis Commander is a SaaS mobile crisis management company operating out of Sweden.

In January 2017, we acquired 100% of the shares of IDV Solutions, LLC, or IDV. We acquired IDV for cash consideration of approximately $21.3 million, with additional time and performance-based milestones that could result in additional payments of $6.2 million. IDV is a provider of threat assessment and operational visualization software located in Lansing, Michigan.

 

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Industry Background

Over the past two decades, methods to assess critical events and to automate and accelerate the process of managing and responding to such events have evolved rapidly, in tandem with advances in technology, to include automated or system-generated responses, including voice calls, text messages, emails, social media and outdoor digital signage. In critical situations, the speed at which information is transmitted and accessed is essential.

Key Trends Driving a Fundamental Shift in Communications

Governmental entities and enterprises face increasing threats to the safety of their geographically disparate and constantly mobile residents and employees. According to the Global Terrorism Database, the number of global fatalities and injuries from terrorist acts has increased 400% from 2005 to 2015, and the world has witnessed devastating attacks in Orlando, Berlin, Brussels, Nice, San Bernardino, Istanbul and other global cities. According to estimates by the Institute for Economics and Peace, the economic cost of terrorism reached $52.9 billion in 2014. In addition, according to the Third National Climate Assessment prepared by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the United States has been experiencing severe weather events above long-term averages, with, for example, the number of heat waves in 2011 and 2012 at nearly triple the long-term average. Similarly, a PricewaterhouseCoopers study found that the number of cyber security incidents across all industries rose by 38% in 2015 versus the prior year and Lloyd’s estimates that cyber-attacks cost businesses as much $400 billion annually. Taken together, global reinsurer Swiss Reinsurance Company Ltd. found that the cost of disaster events, including man-made and severe weather incidents, reached $85 billion worldwide in 2015.

At the same time, key business and technology trends continue to shift both the fundamental way that organizations communicate with relevant stakeholders and how individuals regularly consume information. People increasingly consume most of their information through mobile devices and applications as well as through social media and other digital channels. Increasingly, less information is shared using traditional “analog” communication methods, such as printed media, television and landline telephones. The proliferation of mobile and digital communications, as well as the emergence of the IoT, has accelerated the speed at which people communicate, exponentially increasing the volume of communications that individuals must process. As a result of these dynamics, it has become imperative that communications be appropriately contextualized, meaningful and actionable.

In light of these trends, communications have become one of the most important areas of technology investment. In a 2016 report, Gartner, Inc. estimates that $1.4 trillion, or 41.0%, of information technology, or IT, expenditure was for communications in 2016. Organizations are reaping the benefits of digital communications to more easily and relevantly interact with their target constituents including customers, partners, employees, residents and other key stakeholders. Likewise, as IT innovation continues to shift to on-demand models, organizations have increasingly migrated from on-premises software to cloud-based solutions in order to improve agility and efficiency when seeking to communicate with their global, mobile, distributed stakeholders.

In order to connect people across disparate communication modalities in diverse locations, organizations are increasingly investing in technologies that unify different analog and digital real-time and non-real-time communications. The integration of real-time enterprise communication services such as instant messaging and voice and video conferencing with non-real-time communication services such as voicemail, facsimile and e-mail can provide a consistent and unified user experience across multiple devices and media types.

During public safety threats and critical business events, the ability to communicate life-saving or damage-mitigating information is crucial. Speed, security, scalability and reliability of communications is essential. The severity, complexity and frequency of these critical events, their implications for personal safety or business performance and rising regulatory and compliance challenges are driving demand for CEM solutions, which we estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, represented an $18.3 billion worldwide market opportunity in 2015.

 

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Evolution of Critical Event Management Solutions

Traditional solutions for critical communications have not kept pace with the increasingly digital world, the evolving threat landscape and the opportunity to leverage technological innovation to more effectively communicate with people. These solutions are often developed in-house or are not truly enterprise grade in scale and reliability, leaving many organizations to use analog, manual, one-way and people-based modalities to communicate with relevant stakeholders. These solutions lack the scale to reliably address the breadth of the different critical challenges that organizations increasingly face, the sophistication required to address evolving needs with aggregated data and analysis for threat assessment, automated workflows and the ability to rapidly deliver messages that are contextually tailored to multiple, specific audiences, in precise locations, using a variety of different communication modalities. Traditional critical communication solutions also typically send notifications based upon a person’s static work or home address. Given the mobile nature of today’s workforce, solutions now need to be able to dynamically locate who is near a critical event and send instructions to impacted parties and responders based upon where they actually are.

CEM solutions build upon the strengths of modern critical communications. Organizations today typically manage critical events across the organization in silos that use disparate data sources and unintegrated tools, making it difficult to achieve a common operational view of threats and of the status of response. Utilizing a common contact base, consistent rules engines, threat databases that are integrated with information on the location of an organization’s people, assets and suppliers, and a common visualization platform, CEM solutions can provide a more integrated solution which can improve management control and visibility and lower costs. The ability to cohesively and rapidly share information and collaborate across the organization underlies creating a common operational approach.

Requirements of Effective Critical Event Management Solutions

In order to deliver effective critical communications solutions, several requirements must be met:

 

    Comprehensive Solution.  Organizations require an enterprise-scale, comprehensive solution that can provide them with aggregated data and automated workflows and deliver intelligent, contextual messages across multiple communications modalities – all operated from desktop or mobile devices to accommodate managing critical events whenever they occur.

 

    Scalability and Speed.  Organizations require a solution that is agile and flexible enough to reach individuals at both high volume/low frequency intervals, such as emergency mass notification situations, and low volume/high frequency intervals, such as for IT alerting and secure messaging.

 

    Enterprise-Grade Reliability.  Given the inherent nature of critical events, organizations require a solution that is robust, resilient and highly redundant, with a high level of assured uptime and a low degree of fault tolerance.

 

    Situational Assessment.  Organizations require ready access to information from weather feeds, threat sources and IT monitoring systems, as well as the ability to incorporate trends from social media and feedback from their personnel in the field, in order to assess critical events and impacted areas.

 

    Dynamic Location Capability.  With today’s mobile workforce, organizations need to be able to locate and instruct impacted people, and identify and organize responders, based on where they actually are, not just based on their static office or home location.

 

    Visualization.  Organizations require a visualization platform that integrates threat and incident data from a wide variety of sources, as well as updates on the status of incident response tasks, in order to improve their ability to assess the potential impact of events and the success of mitigation strategies, and to improve management control.

 

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    Security and Regulatory Compliance.  Organizations require a solution that is architected to ensure data and communications security given the significance of the content being managed and the regulatory requirements that apply to the sensitive data being communicated.

 

    Intelligent Communication and Contextual Personalization.  Organizations require sophisticated, intelligent technology that can tailor both the content of communications and the modalities through which they are delivered based on differing individual preferences and roles and responsibilities within the organization.

 

    Ease-of-Use.  Given the need for speed and the pressure and anxiety most people experience in critical situations, organizations require a solution that is simple and easy-to-use, particularly when lives and property are at risk.

 

    Real-Time and After-Event Reporting and Analytics.  To ensure that organizations can measure and improve performance around critical events, a solution should provide detailed, timely and compliant reporting and analytics on organizational responsiveness and the effectiveness of communications.

 

    Global Reach and Local Expertise.  Global communications require a “local” approach to deal with the complexity of varying cultural preferences, languages and device types, as well as technical and regulatory requirements.

Key Benefits of Our Solutions and Competitive Strengths

Everbridge was founded with a vision to help organizations communicate quickly and reliably to deliver the right message, to the right people, on the right device, in the right location, at the right time during public safety threats and critical business events. Our CEM solutions enable organizations to assess threats, locate impacted people and assets, and manage and respond to critical events, all on a single platform. Key benefits of our solutions and competitive strengths include the following:

 

    Comprehensive, Enterprise-Scale Platform.  The core of our solutions is our critical communications platform, which provides multiple layers of redundancy to assure uptime and delivery of communications regardless of volume or throughput requirements. The platform is secure, scalable and reliable, enabling the delivery and verification of tens of millions of different communications virtually anywhere, in any volume, in near real-time. In 2016, we delivered 1.5 billion communications, or over 47 communications per second, through our globally distributed data centers.

 

    Out-of-the-Box, Scalable and Mobile Applications.  Our SaaS-based applications are out-of-the box, enterprise-ready and can be utilized without customer development, testing or ongoing maintenance. Regardless of a customer or prospect’s size or needs, our applications are built to scale to its largest and most complex critical communications requirements.

 

    Aggregated Threat Data and Analysis.  Our software gathers and analyzes information from weather data feeds, public safety and threat data feeds, social media, IT ticketing systems and monitoring systems, as well as inputs and feedback from two-way and polling messages. Data can be geo-mapped and threat and incident data can be used to automatically trigger simple or complex workflows that are tied to standard operating procedures or run-books.

 

    Contextual Communications.  We enable intelligence and personalization in the critical communications process by delivering contextual communications. Our customers can deliver and escalate critical communications broadly to a mass population or to a targeted subset of individuals based on geographic location, skill level, role and communication modality preferences for rich, two-way collaboration.

 

   

Dynamic Location Awareness.  Our platform can provide organizations with the ability to send and receive notifications based on the last known locations of people, not just based on a static office or

 

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home address. Our platform integrates with a variety of sources of location information, including building access control systems and corporate network access solutions. This location-specific approach enables organizations to quickly determine which individuals may be affected by a public safety threat or able to respond to a critical business event, and to provide targeted and relevant instructions and two- way communications.

 

    Large, Dynamic and Rich Communications Data Asset.  As of December 31, 2016, our data asset consists of our contacts databases that manage approximately 130 million contact profiles and connections from more than 3,200 customers based in 28 countries. Our contacts databases, which we refer to as contact stores, are initially created through an upload of contacts from the customer and are automatically updated with the most current contact information provided by the customer or by individuals who opt-in to receive notifications from our Community Engagement application. Our contact stores are repositories for all contact details, attributes and business rules and preferences, such as a person’s last-known location, language spoken, special needs, technical certifications and on-call status.

 

    Multi-channel Visualization.  Our platform provides the ability to create an integrated view of threats, incidents and the status of response, all within the context of the locations of an organization’s people, assets and suppliers. Multiple channels of information can be displayed side-by-side so different facets of a critical event can be monitored simultaneously, and the same data can be displayed on personal computer screens and on a large command center wall to provide flexibility in deployment.

 

    Robust Security, Industry Certification and Compliance.  Our platform is built on a secure and resilient infrastructure with multiple layers of redundancy. Many of our enterprise applications are designed to meet rigorous security and compliance requirements for financial services firms, healthcare institutions, the U.S. federal government and other regulated industries, including facilitating compliance with FINRA and HIPAA standards. Our solutions received designation under the Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering Effective Technology Act of 2002, or SAFETY Act, and certification by U.S. Department of Homeland Security that places us on the approved product list for homeland security. Our solutions are also accredited under the Federal Information Security Management Act of 2002, or FISMA.

 

    Automated Workflows.  Our platform automates the workflows required to complete a critical notification, including establishing the individuals within an organization authorized to send messages, the groups of stakeholders to whom messages will be sent and the content of messages to be sent to different groups of relevant stakeholders, in each case based on incident type. We believe that this automation reduces the amount of time required to send critical notification as well as the associated cost. Our platform also enables customers to automatically establish procedures for improving the success of communication efforts.

 

    Globally Local.  Our platform is designed to be utilized globally while accounting for local cultural, linguistic, regulatory and technological differences. We have relationships with suppliers and carriers in multiple countries to ensure delivery in compliance with local, technical and regulatory requirements. We have localized our user interface in 15 languages and dialects that are spoken by more than 60% of the world’s population.

 

    Next-Generation, Open Architecture.  We developed our platform to easily integrate our applications with other systems. Our solutions provide open Application Program Initiatives, or APIs, and configurable integrations, enabling our platform to work with our customers’ and partners’ pre-existing processes and solutions, increasing the business value we deliver.

 

    Actionable Reporting and Analytics.  Our platform provides real-time dashboards, advanced map-based visualization and ad-hoc reporting across notifications, incidents and contacts. This information is easily accessed for required after-event reviews, continuous process improvements and regulatory compliance.

 

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Our Growth Strategy

We intend to drive growth in our business by building on our position as a global provider of critical event management, critical communications and enterprise safety applications. Key elements of our growth strategy include:

 

    Accelerate Our Acquisition of New Customers.  We have multiple paths of entry into new customers with our portfolio of applications, which are used for a wide variety of use cases across a diverse set of verticals markets. We intend to capitalize on the breadth of our solutions and the technological advantages of our CEM platform to continue to attract new customers. In parallel, we plan to attract new customers by investing in sales and marketing and expanding our channel partner relationships.

 

    Further Penetrate Our Existing Customers.  With revenue retention rates of over 110% for each of the last three years, we believe that there is a significant opportunity within our existing customer base to expand their use of our platform, both by selling new applications and features to our existing customers and selling to additional departments in their organizations. We believe that we have a significant opportunity to increase the lifetime value of our customer relationships as we educate customers about the benefits of our current and future applications that they do not already utilize and of taking an integrated CEM approach. In the last three years we have added five new applications, which have already begun to experience significant growth. These new applications have grown from 6% in the first quarter of 2015 to 30% in the fourth quarter of 2016 of our contracted sales, which represent the total dollar value of new agreements entered into within the prior 12 months, exclusive of renewals.

 

    Develop New Applications to Target New Markets and Use Cases.  Our platform is highly flexible and can support the development of new applications to meet evolving safety and operational challenges. For example, our Safety Connection application enables organizations to locate people and send them notifications based on their dynamic last known location, while actively incorporating threat and other data to allow for targeted and relevant communications. While the historic market for corporate security and safety solutions has been focused on establishing perimeters – locks, alarms and guards – to keep threats to employees outside of the physical premises, our solutions are responsive to the dramatic shift towards an increasingly mobile workforce where employees spend less time in traditional offices. At the same time, protection of employees at traditional places of business remains crucial. Market research completed in 2016 by us together with Emergency Management & Safety Solutions, found that while organizations were very concerned about the risk of workplace violence, 79% said they were at best only somewhat prepared for an active shooter event, and communicating with people in an impacted building was seen as the biggest challenge. In light of these dynamics, we intend to continue to develop new applications for use cases in a variety of new markets and to leverage our platform and our existing customer relationships as a source of new applications, industry use cases, features and solutions.

 

    Expand Our International Footprint.  We intend to continue to expand our local presence in regions such as Europe, the Middle East and Asia to leverage our relationships with local carriers and our ability to deliver messages to over 200 countries and territories in 15 languages and dialects as well as expand our channel partnerships and also to opportunistically consider expanding in other regions.

 

    Maintain Our Technology and Thought Leadership.  We will continue to invest in our core CEM platform and our applications to maintain our technology leadership position. For example, we believe that we are the only company today that provides a full, integrated CEM solution and that we provide the first solution to offer dynamic versus static location awareness integrated with analysis and communications for the employee safety and security marketplace. Further, we believe we have a competitive advantage through our commitment to innovation and thought leadership that has enabled us to take market share from our competitors and accelerate our growth.

 

    Opportunistically Pursue Acquisitions.  We plan to selectively pursue acquisitions of complementary businesses, technologies and teams that allow us to penetrate new markets and add features and functionalities to our platform.

 

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Our Market Opportunity

There is a significant demand for CEM solutions that meet the above requirements. We estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, that the market for CEM solutions represented an $18.3 billion worldwide opportunity in 2015. This consists of an estimated addressable market of $7.3 billion in North America and $11.0 billion outside of North America. As the adoption of targeted and contextually aware CEM solutions continues to expand and take hold across a broader cross-section of organizations and industry verticals, we estimate, based on data from Frost & Sullivan, presented in an independent study commissioned by us, and data from Markets and Markets, that our addressable market will grow at a compound annual growth rate of 17.5% to $41.1 billion in 2020.

More specifically, Markets and Markets estimates that the aggregate market for mass notification software and services was $1.7 billion in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 20.9% to $4.4 billion in 2020. Within the market for mass notification software and services, Markets and Markets estimates that the distributed recipient solutions segment was $713 million in 2015, and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 24.8% to $2.6 billion in 2021. Further, Frost & Sullivan estimates that: (1) the market for IT service alerting was $183 million in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 32.7% to $753 million in 2020; (2) the market for telemedicine was $374 million in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 15.0% to $752 million in 2020; (3) the market for secure mobile messaging was $325 million in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 16.4% to $694 million in 2020; (4) the market for community engagement was $122 million in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 33.4% to $516 million in 2020; and (5) the market for IoT was $3.3 billion in 2015 and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 24.6% to $9.9 billion in 2020. Finally, Markets and Markets estimates that: (1) the market for safety and security and physical security and information management was $9.6 billion in 2015, and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 8.9% to $14.8 billion in 2020; and (2) the market for predictive analytics was $2.7 billion in 2015, and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 27.4% to $9.2 billion in 2020.

Our Platform

Since inception, our SaaS-based critical communications engine was architected on a single code base to deliver multi-tenant capability and the speed, scale and resilience necessary to communicate globally when a serious event occurs. This engine is designed to address both the emergency and operational components of a critical communications program, and is capable of providing two-way communications and verified delivery in accordance with our customers’ escalation policies. Our critical communications engine has multi-modal communications reach, including redundant global SMS and voice delivery capabilities, and is designed to comply with local, technical and regulatory requirements, which we believe has provided us with a competitive advantage. For example, we believe that our early deployment of local SMS codes intended to comply with rules established by the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India allowed us to increase our SMS delivery success rates in India. Our CEM platform builds on the strengths of this critical communications engine, adding capabilities for integrated threat assessment, visualization, incident management and analytics.

Additional core technical attributes of our platform include:

 

    Monitors more than 100 types of threat data for situation assessment.

 

    Multi-tenant architecture that supports multiple layers of redundancy to maximize uptime and delivery of critical content, regardless of volume or throughput requirements.

 

    Dynamic spatial/geographic information system capability to geo-target communications by zip code, street address or a specific radius from a location.

 

    Support for two-way communications and alerting on over 100 different devices and endpoints, including landline and wireless phones, hand-held communication and other voice-capable devices, satellite, SMS, two-way radios, outdoor digital signage, sirens and internet enabled devices.

 

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    Designed to meet rigorous security and compliance requirements for financial services firms, healthcare institutions, the U.S. federal government and other regulated industries, including facilitating compliance with health care requirements such as HIPAA privacy and security standards.

 

    Extensive set of APIs and configuration capabilities to allow customers and partners to easily integrate our platform with other systems. Our APIs’ two-way invocation capabilities enable third-party systems to flexibly and easily integrate with our platform.

 

    Multi-channel visualization capabilities support integrated views of threats, incidents and status of response to improve management visibility and control.

 

    Supports easy-to-use native mobile applications, including multiple secure mobile applications for message initiation, management and reporting.

 

    Supports push notifications and two-way conversations that enable mobile users to send and receive secure messages such as text, pictures, videos and the users’ current geographic locations.

Our Contact Stores

Our contact stores manage approximately 130 million contact profiles and connections from more than 3,200 customers based in 28 countries as of December 31, 2016, up from 15 million contact profiles as of December 31, 2012. They are initially created through an upload of contacts from the customer and are automatically updated with the most current contact information provided by the customer or by individuals who opt-in to receive notification from our Community Engagement application. Our contact stores are simultaneously enriched by geographic, situational and other real-time data. Our contact stores are repositories for all contact details, attributes and business rules and preferences, such as a person’s last-known location, language spoken, special needs, technical certifications and on-call status.

We leverage the data contained in our contact stores in a number of significant ways. Our data asset across multiple verticals enables us to develop best practices for reaching the intended contact, on the correct device, at the right location, at the appropriate time. We also use these data to better understand our customer base and their emerging use cases in order to improve our existing applications and develop new applications.

Everbridge Publishing Network

An important component of our platform is our Everbridge Publishing Network, which allows our customers to share relevant situational awareness information with each other. Public safety agencies, for example, can publish information to the Everbridge Publishing Network about incidents that might prove disruptive to the movement of people, goods and services for businesses within a certain area. If any of those businesses are also customers of ours, they will receive this information from a source they know is vetted and reliable, and will be able to take timely steps to mitigate or remediate the situation.

Our Applications

Through our CEM platform, we deliver reliable enterprise-ready applications that provide organizations with the ability to assess threats, locate people, automate actions, monitor incident response, and deliver contextual communications in any volume, in near-real time. We have designed our applications’ user interface to be easy to use. We understand that since some of our applications will be utilized to manage complex situations or to send large volumes of messages to key stakeholders during stressful situations, streamlining the user interface to reduce user errors and anxiety is essential. We conduct extensive usability testing and design reviews with our stakeholders, and have applied in our designs the lessons learned over more than a decade of working with critical communications users and professionals.

 

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Our applications enable:

 

    Communications to key stakeholders during emergency situations.

 

    Corporate communications with customers and employees.

 

    Automated outreach to on-call personnel.

 

    Integrated threat assessment and visualization.

 

    Workgroup collaboration on mobile devices.

 

    Integration of physical security data with location awareness data gathered from travel, network and access systems to rapidly find and communicate with employees during disruptive events.

 

    Securely designed and efficiently implemented communications among healthcare providers and patients.

 

    Community engagement and collaboration with citizens and businesses.

 

    Critical IoT communications between machines and from machines to people

 

    Mobile response plan deployment and management of incidence response.

Our applications include:

 

    Mass Notification. Our secure, scalable and reliable Mass Notification application is our most established application and enables enterprises and governmental entities to send contextually aware notifications to individuals or groups to keep them informed before, during and after natural or man-made disasters and other emergencies. We provide robust analytics, map-based targeting, flexible group management, distributed contact data, language localization, multiple options for contact data management and a globally-optimized approach to voice and SMS routing. We also support community engagement functionality, which provides a direct link between residents and emergency management departments with the goal of fostering public safety.

 

    Safety Connection. Our Safety Connection application enables organizations to send notifications based on dynamic last known location of an individual, including the airport, street, building floor or conference room at which the individual was most recently present, while actively incorporating threat and other data to allow for targeted and relevant communications. When fully deployed, the application can also aggregate near real-time data from multiple sources, including building access control systems, wired and wireless network access points, travel management systems and mobile application check-ins. We believe that Safety Connection represents a significant advance in helping organizations use critical communications to keep their constituents safe, as many current solutions use only static office and residential locations that are not sufficiently location-aware relative to an increasingly mobile workforce.

 

    Incident Management. Our Incident Management application enables organizations to automate workflows and make their communications contextually relevant using drag and drop business rules to determine who should be contacted, how they should be contacted and what information is required. We believe that this application decreases costly human errors and reduces downtime, while simultaneously capturing required compliance information. We also support cross-account collaboration and situational intelligence sharing during crises for corporations and communities.

 

   

IT Alerting. Our IT Alerting application enables IT professionals to alert and communicate with key members of their teams during an IT incident or outage, including during a cyber security breach. The application integrates with IT service management platforms, including ServiceNow, and uses automatic

 

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escalation of alerts, on-call scheduling and mobile alerting to automate manual tasks and keep IT teams collaborating during an incident. We also provide real-time shift calendars with integrated on-call notifications to help users better manage employee resources and get the right message, to the right person, at the right time through automated staffing. Taken together, our IT Alerting application has the potential to provide meaningful savings to organizations by reducing mean-time-to-repair. Each minute of unplanned downtime costs organizations an average of approximately $5,600, according to Gartner, while 59% of Fortune 500 companies experience 1.6 hours of downtime per week, according to Dunn & Bradstreet. IHS, Inc. estimates information and communication technology downtime costs North American organizations $700 billion per year.

 

    Visual Command Center. Our Virtual Command Center application enables customers to monitor and integrate more than 100 types of threat data, as well as information on internal incidents, to generate and visualize an alert when potential risks occur within proximity of an organization’s physical locations, suppliers, assets or people. The solution improves the ability to more quickly understand and assess the impact of threats, execute the correct response, and monitor on-going resolution in order to mitigate risk to personnel safety, business continuity, assets and supply chain operations.

 

    Community Engagement. Our Community Engagement application integrates emergency management and community outreach by providing local governments with a unified solution to connect residents to their public safety department, public information resources, and neighbors via social media and mobile applications. This creates a stronger and more engaged community improving the communication reach for emergency personnel, while providing residents with real-time emergency and community information, and allows residents to anonymously opt-in and provide tips. For example, the City of Philadelphia experienced a 70% increase in opt-ins in 2015 with our Community Engagement application.

 

    Crisis Commander. Our Crisis Commander application provides mobile access to crisis, recovery and brand protection plans, as well as the capability to manage a crisis or event through role-based assignments and status updates. Organizations can enhance their overall crisis management efforts by making plans readily available to responders on the most popular mobile platforms regardless of their location. The application also simplifies updating plans for changes to personnel or processes, and enhances visibility into response progress during a critical event.

 

    Secure Messaging. Our Secure Messaging application meets the compliance and security requirements of organizations that need to provide an alternative way for their employees to communicate and share nonpublic information. A tailored version of our Secure Messaging application, CareConverge, is designed for medical professionals and facilitates HIPAA-compliant communications without the need for pagers and other single use devices, supporting the development of a “connected” hospital. CareConverge also facilitates telemedicine by allowing medical professionals to hold video conferences with patients and other medical professionals as well as share medical imaging, lab results and other critical information. Our Secure Messaging application also enables financial services organizations’ employees and customers to securely communicate via text, voice, and video, while remaining FINRA compliant.

Our Technology

The design and development of our applications and our critical communication and critical event management platforms include the following key attributes:

 

   

Robust, Enterprise-Grade Scalability and Reliability.  Given the mission-critical nature of our solutions, our multi-tenant platform was designed to provide a robust, high level of resiliency, scalability and redundancy. We use multiple geographically distributed service providers and communications carriers to achieve a high degree of redundancy, fault tolerance and cost-effective operations. We have multiple layers of redundancy and a horizontal scaling model across our

 

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infrastructure to deliver high availability and performance. Our redundant data centers are located in Los Angeles, California; Denver, Colorado; San Francisco, California; Dallas, Texas; St. Louis, Missouri; and Toronto, Canada as well as in Germany, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. Similarly, we leverage redundant downstream communications providers to enable our services to remain uninterrupted even if a particular provider encounters technical difficulties.

 

    Multi-Modal, Globally Local Communications Delivery.  We optimize international call routing across hundreds of telecommunications providers to enable higher voice quality, improved delivery rates during emergencies and the ability to configure local caller IDs to improve recognition and answer rates. We also work with multiple SMS providers to identify regulatory hurdles and deploy and actively manage an optimal mix of national and international SMS codes to ensure high delivery and response rates.

 

    Security and Compliance.  Our security and data protection policies and controls are based on the Federal Information Security Management Act risk management framework defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST, special publication, or SP, 800-37. To meet the rigorous standards of our enterprise and government customers, an independent and accredited third-party security assessment firm annually verifies our compliance with over 800 security and data protection requirements detailed in NIST SP 800-53. Through this process, we map our compliance with other security and data privacy frameworks including ISO 27001 and HIPAA. In addition, we hold certifications including SysTrust Statement on Standards for Attestation Engagements No. 16, Service Operations Controls 2 & 3.We have also been awarded approvals by DHS that enable us to receive priority treatment for vital voice and data circuits or other telecommunications services. More recently, our critical communications solutions received designation under the SAFETY Act and certification by DHS that places us on the approved product list for homeland security and provides us with the highest level of liability protection available under the SAFETY Act. The certification similarly protects our customers from legal liability claims arising from acts of terrorism, as contemplated by the SAFETY Act. Further, our solutions are accredited under FISMA and we are certified under the EU-US Privacy Shield to meet regulatory requirements governing the processing of European Union residents’ personal data outside of the European Union.

 

    Hybrid Infrastructure.  To provide highly scalable and global solutions, we employ redundant, geographically diverse production implementations of our platform infrastructure in multiple SOC 2-compliant data center facilities in North America and Europe. Within each data center, we utilize a hybrid-cloud architecture that enables us to leverage both proprietary and third-party infrastructure services to enable “on-demand” capacity and performance without substantial upfront investment. Our hybrid-cloud architecture enables our customers to select the location in which to store their contact data, allowing for compliance with local and international data privacy laws. Our architecture also enables our platform to dynamically determine the best location from which to deliver critical communications on behalf of our customers and solves many international communications delivery challenges by utilizing in-country or in-region telephony, messaging and data communication providers. Our infrastructure is continuously maintained and monitored by dedicated engineers based in redundant network operations centers in the Los Angeles and Boston areas.

 

    Dynamic Location Detection.  Our platform can create and update dynamic data sets containing a contact’s last-known location, including the airport, street, building floor or conference room at which the contact was most recently present. Multiple data sources can be aggregated including building access control and badging systems, wired and wireless network access points, and corporate travel management and office hoteling systems. These data are used to best locate a contact in an emergency or critical business situation, independent of the contact’s home or office location. Contacts can also share their location via a three-in-one mobile panic button application, which sends a panic message to the applicable organization’s security team, and also includes the ability to send audio and video content, to check-in to capture and report geo-location data and to establish a safe corridor through a potentially unsafe area.

 

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Our Comprehensive Customer Support Services

We are committed to the success of our customers. We demonstrate this commitment by offering a comprehensive set of support services to help our customers get started quickly, follow best practices, and realize on-going value from our critical communications solution. Our support services include:

 

    Rapid Onboarding. We leverage a proven methodology and domain expertise, honed through thousands of customer on-boardings worldwide, to enable rapid use of our platform and compliance with industry best practices. Promptly after a customer purchases one or more of our applications, our dedicated onboarding team begins to configure our solutions to meet the customer’s needs, including specific messages and scenarios, ad-hoc report templates and incident management reviews. The onboarding service incorporates years of critical communications experiences, including our critical communications certification training through Everbridge University, to improve customer success. The average implementation time for new customers purchasing our solutions is 10 hours.

 

    Everbridge University. We offer online education, training and professional development through Everbridge University, with role-based training modules that can be customized to meet a customer’s needs and that can facilitate formalized knowledge transfer and ensure ongoing self-sufficiency. Everbridge University is available anytime, online and is configured for self-paced use. To date, Everbridge University has delivered over 700,000 online training lessons.

 

    Dedicated Account Management. We assign dedicated account managers to all customers. Our account managers work exclusively with customers in a specific industry so they understand the applicable needs and challenges. They act as informed guides to help our customers make effective decisions in deploying our applications. Account managers perform regular service reviews and post-incident analyses of customer communications to incorporate communication best practices, and recommend additional applications to meet the customer’s critical communications needs.

 

    24/7 Technical Support & Emergency Live Operator Service. We have established geographically redundant technical support centers in the Los Angeles, California; Boston, Massachusetts; and London, United Kingdom areas. From these support centers, we offer our customers 24/7 support by phone, email or through our online support center. In addition, our support centers offer a 24/7 emergency live operator service to assist customers with sending critical communications.

 

    Premium Support Services. With an understanding of the critical role that our solution plays, we have invested in assembling an expert professional services organization to deliver premium support service packages to our customers. Our professional services team includes certified emergency management and critical communications practitioners. Our premium support services address the unique challenges of customers’ organizational structures, operational requirements, implementation and training needs. We believe that we help customers achieve faster time-to-value by providing on-site project management, consultation with a certified critical communications professional, creation of client-specific message and scenarios, development of ad-hoc report templates and on-site emergency and incident management reviews.

Our Customers

Our customer base has grown from 867 customers at the end of 2011 to more than 3,200 customers as of December 31, 2016. We define a customer as a contracting entity from which we generated $100 or more of revenue in the prior month, either directly or through a channel partner. We do not include customers of our wholly-owned subsidiary, Microtech, which generates an immaterial amount of our revenue in any given year. At the end of 2011 we had 20 customers with contracts valued at $100,000 or more, whereas as of December 31, 2016 we had 106 customers with contracts valued at $100,000 or more, including eight customers with contracts in excess of $500,000. As of December 31, 2016, our customers were based in 28 countries and included eight of

 

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the 10 largest U.S. cities, eight of the 10 largest U.S.-based investment banks, 24 of the 25 busiest North American airports, six of the 10 largest global consulting firms, six of the 10 largest global auto makers, all four of the largest global accounting firms, four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health care providers and four of the 10 largest U.S.-based health insurers. We provide solutions to customers of varying sizes, including enterprises, small businesses, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and government agencies. Our customers span a wide variety of industries, including technology, energy, financial services, transportation, healthcare and life sciences, manufacturing, media and entertainment, retail, higher education and professional services. For the year ended December 31, 2016, 49% of our revenue was generated from enterprise customers, 35% from government and government-related customers and 16% from healthcare-related customers. No customer contributed more than 5% of our total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2016.

Some of our representative customers by sector include the following:

 

Enterprise

 

Healthcare

 

State and Local Government

Alexion Pharmaceuticals

  Alexian Brothers Medical Center   Boston Police Department

Cardtronics

  Boston Children’s Hospital   Chicago Department of Aviation

Choice Hotels

  Catholic Health Initiatives   City of Torrance

Customers Bank

  Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia   Florida Division of Emergency Management

Digital Realty

DTE Energy

East West Bank

EnerNOC

Ericsson

Express Scripts

Facebook

KOR Energy

Pearson

Sierra Nevada

Uber

Xerox

 

Covenant Health System

Doctors Health at Renaissance Health System

Florida Health

Hawaii Pacific Health

Molina Healthcare

Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Penrose St. Francis Health Services

Spectrum Health

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

 

Los Angeles Police Department

Miami International Airport

Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District

National Capital Region

Northeast Region Community Awareness

Emergency Response

State of Connecticut, Department of

Emergency Services and Public Protection

University of Louisiana System

U.S. Department of Transportation

 

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Everbridge Case Studies

 

LOGO

 

LOGO

 

 

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LOGO

 

LOGO

Sales and Marketing

Our sales and marketing organizations collaborate to create brand preference, efficiently and effectively generate leads, build a strong sales pipeline and cultivate customer relationships to help drive revenue growth. Our go-to-market strategy consists of a strong thought-leadership program, digital marketing engine and a diversified sales organization designed to efficiently sell across vertical markets to organizations of all sizes. We have dedicated sales teams focused on corporate customers, government customers and healthcare organizations, which covers U.S. federal, state and local governmental entities.

We believe that our sales and marketing model is economically compelling. We spent $0.93 and $0.95 to generate each $1.00 of new sales in 2015 and 2016, respectively, which reflects our sales and marketing expense

 

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incurred in 2015 and 2016 (other than expense related to full-time employees dedicated to client retention) compared to 12 months of contract value for contracts entered into in 2015 and 2016, and $0.06 to renew each $1.00 of renewal sales in each of 2015 and 2016, which reflects our sales and marketing expense related to full-time employees dedicated to client retention compared to 12 months of contract value for contracts renewed in 2016 and 2015.

Sales

We sell our solutions through our telephone and direct inside sales teams, a direct field sales team and a growing partner channel. Our global sales teams focus on both new customer acquisition and up-selling and cross-selling additional and new offerings, respectively, to our existing customers. Our sales teams are organized by geography, consisting of the Americas; Europe, the Middle East and Africa, or EMEA; as well as by target organization size. Our inside sales team focuses typically on small and middle-market transactions, while larger or more complex transactions are generally handled by our direct field sales teams. Our highly trained sales engineers help define customer use cases, manage pilots and train channel partners.

In addition to the vertical and geographic distribution of our salesforce, we have dedicated teams of account executives focused on net new accounts, account managers responsible for renewal and growth of existing accounts, and business development representatives targeting new and growth business opportunity creation. Our sales representatives use phone, email and web meetings to interact with prospects and customers. In 2016, we increased the headcount of our sales organization, and we intend to continue to invest in building our global sales and go-to-market organizations.

We also sell through channel partners both domestically and internationally. To help integrate our applications with other third-party services and take advantage of current and emerging technologies, we seek to enter into alliances with leading technology companies.

Marketing

We focus our marketing efforts on increasing the strength of the Everbridge brand, communicating product advantages and business benefits, generating leads for our salesforce and channel partners, leveraging geographic market strengths and driving product adoption. We run campaigns that take advantage of a network effect in which success within a region encourages other organizations within that area to choose our solutions, in part to be using a system consistent with that of other entities in the area with which they may share information or best practices. We deliver targeted content to demonstrate our thought leadership in critical communications best practices and use digital advertising methods to drive conversion of potential prospects, which convert to opportunities for our sales organization.

Our marketing team focuses on inbound marketing through our industry-leading content, resources, and sharing customer best practices. We rely on multiple marketing and sales automation tools to efficiently market to, and automatically identify qualified individuals using product and industry specific criteria. We use multiple marketing tactics to engage with prospective customers including: email marketing, event marketing, print and digital advertising, and webinar events. We engage with existing customers to provide vertically-based education and awareness and to promote expanded use of our current and new software offerings within these customers. We also host regional and national events to engage both customers and prospects, deliver product training and foster community.

Research and Development

We invest substantial resources in research and development and leverage offshore development in multiple geographies to implement a “follow the sun” engineering strategy and to increase the efficiency of our overall development efforts. We enhance our core technology platform and applications, develop new end market-specific solutions and applications, and conduct application and quality assurance testing. Our technical and engineering team monitors and tests our applications on a regular basis, and we maintain a regular release

 

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process to refine, update, and enhance our existing applications. Research and development expense totaled $7.4 million, $11.5 million and $14.8 million for 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively.

Our Competition

The market for CEM solutions is highly fragmented, intensely competitive and constantly evolving. We compete with an array of established and emerging companies, many of whom are single product or single market focused, as well as in-house solutions. With the introduction of new technologies and market entrants, we expect the competitive environment to remain intense going forward. The primary competitors for our Mass Notification and Incident Management applications include: BlackBerry Limited, Emergency Communications Network, F24 AG, Enera Inc., Nuance Communications, Inc., SWN Communications Inc. and SunGard Data Systems Inc. The primary competitors for our IT Alerting application include: PagerDuty, Inc. and xMatters, Inc. The primary competitors for our Secure Messaging application include: DocHalo, LLC, Spok, Inc., Perfect Serve, Inc. and TigerText, Inc. With respect to our recent acquisitions, the primary competitors for our Visual Command Center and Crisis Commander applications include Planet Risk Inc. and In Case of Crisis, respectively.

We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including:

 

    product functionality, including local and multi-modal delivery in international markets;

 

    breadth of offerings;

 

    performance, security, scalability and reliability;

 

    compliance with local regulations and multi-language support;

 

    brand recognition, reputation and customer satisfaction;

 

    ease of implementation, use and maintenance; and

 

    total cost of ownership.

We believe that we compete favorably with respect to all of these factors and that we are well positioned as a leading provider of targeted and contextually relevant critical communications.

Intellectual Property

Our future success and competitive position depend in part on our ability to protect our intellectual property and proprietary technologies. To safeguard these rights, we rely on a combination of patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws and contractual protections in the United States and other jurisdictions.

As of December 31, 2016, we had 14 issued patents and four patent applications pending in the United States. We also had one issued patent in Canada. We cannot assure you that any patents will issue from any patent applications, that patents that issue from such applications will give us the protection that we seek or that any such patents will not be challenged, invalidated, or circumvented. Any patents that may issue in the future from our pending or future patent applications may not provide sufficiently broad protection and may not be enforceable in actions against alleged infringers.

We have registered the “Everbridge” and “Nixle” names in the United States, and have registered the “Everbridge” name in the European Union. We have registrations and/or pending applications for additional marks in the United States; however, we cannot assure you that any future trademark registrations will be issued for pending or future applications or that any registered trademarks will be enforceable or provide adequate protection of our proprietary rights.

We also license software from third parties for integration into our offerings, including open source software and other software available on commercially reasonable terms. We cannot assure you that such third parties will maintain such software or continue to make it available.

 

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We are the registered holder of a variety of domestic and international domain names that include everbridge.com, as well as similar variations on that name.

In order to protect our unpatented proprietary technologies and processes, we rely on trade secret laws and confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, vendors and others. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary technology and trade secrets, unauthorized parties may attempt to misappropriate, reverse engineer or otherwise obtain and use them. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets, in which case we would not be able to assert trade secret rights, or develop similar technologies and processes. Further, the contractual provisions that we enter into may not prevent unauthorized use or disclosure of our proprietary technology or intellectual property rights and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our proprietary technology or intellectual property rights.

If we become more successful, we believe that competitors will be more likely to try to develop solutions that are similar to ours and that may infringe our proprietary rights. It may also be more likely that competitors or other third parties will claim that our solutions infringe their proprietary rights.

Patent and other intellectual property disputes are common in our industry and we have been involved in such disputes from time to time in the ordinary course of our business. Some companies, including some of our competitors, own large numbers of patents, copyrights and trademarks, which they may use to assert claims against us. Third parties may in the future assert claims of infringement, misappropriation or other violations of intellectual property rights against us. They may also assert such claims against our customers whom we typically indemnify against claims that our solution infringes, misappropriates or otherwise violates the intellectual property rights of third parties. As the numbers of products and competitors in our market increase and overlaps occur, claims of infringement, misappropriation and other violations of intellectual property rights may increase. Any claim of infringement, misappropriation or other violation of intellectual property rights by a third party, even those without merit, could cause us to incur substantial costs defending against the claim and could distract our management from our business.

Government Regulation

We are subject to a number of U.S. federal and state and foreign laws and regulations that involve matters central to our business. These laws and regulations may involve privacy, data protection, intellectual property, competition, consumer protection, export taxation or other subjects. Many of the laws and regulations to which we are subject are still evolving and being tested in courts and could be interpreted in ways that could harm our business. In addition, the application and interpretation of these laws and regulations often are uncertain, particularly in the new and rapidly evolving industry in which we operate. Because global laws and regulations have continued to develop and evolve rapidly, it is possible that we may not be, or may not have been, compliant with each such applicable law or regulation.

Culture and Employees

We believe that our culture has been a key contributor to our success to-date and that the critical nature of the solutions that we provide promotes a sense of greater purpose and fulfillment in our employees. We have invested in building a strong corporate culture and believe it is one of our most important and sustainable sources of competitive advantage.

As of December 31, 2016, we had 467 full-time employees, including 98 in data center operations and customer support, 182 in sales and marketing, 123 in research and development and 64 in general and administrative. As of December 31, 2016, we had 360 full-time employees in the United States and 107 full-time employees internationally. None of our U.S. employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements. We believe our employee relations are good and we have not experienced any work stoppages.

 

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Facilities

Our principal executive offices are located in Burlington, Massachusetts, where we occupy an approximately 45,000 square-foot facility under a lease expiring on May 31, 2022, and in Pasadena, California, where we occupy an approximately 19,000 square-foot facility under a lease expiring on June 30, 2018. We also have offices in San Francisco, California; Lansing, Michigan; Windsor, United Kingdom; Colchester, United Kingdom, Norsburg, Sweden and Beijing, China.

Legal Proceedings

From time to time we may become involved in legal proceedings or be subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. We are not presently a party to any legal proceedings that, if determined adversely to us, would individually or taken together have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition or cash flows. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.

Segments

We view our operations and manage our business as one operating segment. See our consolidated financial statements for a discussion of revenues, operating loss, net loss and total assets.

Geographic Information

For a description of our revenue and long-lived assets by geographic location, see note 16 to our consolidated financial statements included in this prospectus.

 

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MANAGEMENT

Executive Officers and Directors

The following table sets forth information concerning our executive officers and directors as of December 31, 2016:

 

Name

  

  Age  

  

Position(s)

Executive Officers      
Jaime Ellertson . . .    59    President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors
Kenneth S. Goldman . . .    57    Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
Imad Mouline . . . . . .    46    Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer
Joel Rosen . . .    58    Chief Marketing Officer
Elliot J. Mark    51    Senior Vice President and General Counsel
Scott Burnett .    51    Senior Vice President, Operations
Yuan Cheng . . .    45    Senior Vice President, Engineering
Nicholas Hawkins . .    54    Managing Director, EMEA
Gary Phillips . .    57    Senior Vice President, Sales
Claudia Dent . . . . . . . . . . .    56    Senior Vice President, Product Management
Non-Employee Directors      
Richard D’Amore . .    63    Director
Bruns Grayson . . .    69    Director
David Henshall .    48    Director
Kent Mathy . . .    57    Director
Cinta Putra . . . .    51    Director

Executive Officers

Jaime Ellertson has served as our President and Chief Executive Officer since September 2011 and as Chairman of our board of directors since March 2011, after joining our board of directors in April 2010. From November 2010 to September 2011, Mr. Ellertson was Chief Executive Officer and chairman of the board of directors of CloudFloor Corporation, a provider of cloud solutions, which we acquired in 2011. Previously, Mr. Ellertson served as the Chief Executive Officer and President and as a member of the board of directors of Gomez Inc., a company specializing in monitoring and managing website data and web application performance, from December 2005 to October 2010. From 2000 to July 2005, Mr. Ellertson served as Chief Executive Officer and President and as a member of the board of directors of S1 Corporation, a software provider to the financial services marketplace, which was acquired by ACI Worldwide Inc. He also previously served as chairman of the board of directors and Chief Executive Officer of Interleaf, Inc., a provider of software tools for e-content management, from 1997 until its acquisition by BroadVision, Inc. in April 2000, after which he served as Executive Vice President and General Manager of Worldwide Strategic Operations for BroadVision, a provider of self-service applications, until November 2000. Earlier in his career, Mr. Ellertson founded several software companies including Openware Technologies Inc., Document Automation Corporation and Purview Technologies Inc. Since June 2014, Mr. Ellertson has served as chairman of the board of directors of hVIVO PLC, a viral challenge and services company, and since August 2012, Mr. Ellertson has served as a member of the board of directors of PeopleFluent, Inc., a provider of human capital management software and services. From December 2010 to December 2014, Mr. Ellertson served as a member of the board of director of Qvidian, a provider of cloud-based sales execution solutions. Our board of directors believes that Mr. Ellertson’s business expertise and his daily insight into corporate matters as our Chief Executive Officer qualify him to serve on our board of directors.

Kenneth S. Goldman has served as our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since April 2015. From July 2014 to March 2015, Mr. Goldman was Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Fiksu, Inc., a provider of mobile application marketing technologies. Previously, Mr. Goldman served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Black Duck Software, Inc., an open source software solutions provider, from March 2008 to July 2014, as Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and a member of the board of

 

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directors of Salary.com, a provider of compensation management software, from March 2006 to February 2008, as a principal and Mirus Capital Advisors, Inc., an investment banking firm, from April 2004 to March 2006. Earlier in his career, Mr. Goldman held financial executive leadership positions at LODESTAR Corporation, a provider of software solutions for energy market participants that was acquired by Oracle Corporation, Student Advantage, Inc., a provider of marketing and commerce solutions aimed at college students, and MediaMap, Inc., a provider of workflow and database management solutions that was acquired by Cision, Inc. Mr. Goldman began his career at KPMG LLP. He is a CPA and holds a B.S. in accounting and managerial law & public policy, from the Martin J. Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University.

Imad Mouline has served as our Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer since September 2011. From March 2011 to September 2011, Mr. Mouline was Chief Technology Officer of CloudFloor. Previously, Mr. Mouline served as Chief Technology Officer of Compuware Corporation’s Application Performance Management Solutions division from November 2009 to March 2011, as Chief Technology Officer of Gomez from January 2006 to November 2009 and as Chief Technology Officer of S1 from June 2001 to October 2005. Earlier in his career, Mr. Mouline held positions at BroadVision and Interleaf. Mr. Mouline holds an S.B. in Management Science / Information Technology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Joel Rosen has served as our Chief Marketing Officer since January 2016. From September 2013 to October 2015, Mr. Rosen served as Executive Vice President, Product and Marketing of Endurance International Group, Inc., a web hosting company. Previously, Mr. Rosen was a principal at Landmark Associates, a consulting company, from September 2008 to September 2013, was President and Chief Executive Officer of Tizor Systems, Inc., a data security company which was subsequently acquired by Netezza Corp., from June 2006 to August 2008 and was a partner at Charles River Ventures, a venture capital firm, from September 2001 to June 2005. Earlier in his career, Mr. Rosen was President and Chief Executive Officer of NaviSite Inc., a web hosting company which was subsequently acquired by Time Warner Cable Inc., and also held positions at Aspen Technology, Inc., a software solutions provider for process manufacturers, and at Bain & Company, a management consulting firm. Mr. Rosen holds a B.A. in economics from Harvard University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

Elliot J. Mark has served as our Senior Vice President and General Counsel since November 2015. From September 2010 to November 2015, Mr. Mark served as Vice President and General Counsel of Northern Power Systems Corp., a designer and manufacturer of wind turbines and power converters. Previously, Mr. Mark served as General Counsel of Gomez from May 2009 to February 2010, as Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Salary.com from October 2006 to January 2009 and as Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Viisage Technology, Inc., a provider of identity verification technology, from August 2003 to September 2006. Earlier in his career, Mr. Mark held positions at eRoom Technology Inc., a provider of collaboration software, SimPlayer.com Ltd., a sports media technology company, Arthur D. Little Inc., a management consulting firm, and Molten Metal Technology Inc., a recycling technology company. Mr. Mark holds a B.A. in international relations from Wesleyan University and a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center.

Scott Burnett has served as our Senior Vice President, Operations since March 2013. From March 2011 to March 2013, Mr. Burnett served as Executive Vice President, Product Development, Engineering and Operations for Axeda Corporation, a provider of software for connected products that was acquired by PTC. Previously, Mr. Burnett served as Vice President, Global Engineering and Operations of Compuware’s Application Performance Management Solutions division from January 2010 to March 2011 and as Vice President, Global Engineering and Operations of Gomez, from September 2007 to January 2010. Earlier in his career, Mr. Burnett held positions at Arbor Networks, a provider of network security solutions, ModusLink Global Solutions, Inc. (formerly CMGI, Inc.), an Internet investment and holding company, and Liberty Global plc, a telecommunications company. Mr. Burnett holds a B.S.E.E. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an M.S.E.E. in electrical engineering and communication systems management from Southern Methodist University.

 

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Yuan Cheng has served as our Senior Vice President, Engineering since April 2012. From March 2011 to April 2012, Mr. Cheng served as Chief Executive Officer of Hypersun Group Ltd., an internet and software engineering services firm, which we acquired in 2012. Previously, Mr. Cheng served as General Manager of Gomez’s China operations from March 2006 to February 2011 and as manager of the BroadVision Commerce product at BroadVision from January 2001 to January 2006. Mr. Cheng holds a B.E. in precisions instruments from Tsinghua University and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Nicholas Hawkins has served as our Managing Director, EMEA since April 2015. From March 2012 to March 2015, Mr. Hawkins served as Vice President of Sales, EMEA at Trustwave Holdings, Inc., an information security company, from January 2010 to January 2012, Mr. Hawkins served as Vice President, EMEA Managed Service Products at M86 Security Ltd., an information security company, and from January 2008 to December 2009, Mr. Hawkins served as Vice President, EMEA Sales at M86 Security. Earlier in his career, Mr. Hawkins held sales positions at Marshal Systems Ltd., a global information security company, and MessageLabs, an integrated messaging and web security services company that was acquired by Symantec Corporation. Mr. Hawkins joined the Metropolitan Police in 1980 and served as an operational police officer in London for 10 years.

Gary Phillips has served as our Senior Vice President, Sales since January 2012. From March 2010 to December 2011, Mr. Phillips served Vice President, North American Sales of Compuware’s Application Performance Management Solutions division and as Vice President, North American Sales of Gomez from September 2009 to March 2010. Previously, Mr. Phillips served as Chief Executive Officer of Marathon Technologies Corp., a software and network technology company, from May 2005 to July 2009. Earlier in his career, Mr. Phillips held positions at Avaki, a provider of enterprise network solutions, BroadVision and Interleaf, a provider of software products for the publishing industry. Mr. Phillips holds a B.S. in business administration and marketing from Plymouth State University.

Claudia Dent has served as our Senior Vice President, Product Management since November 2016. From August 2012 to November 2016, Ms. Dent served as our Vice President, Product Management. From November 2010 to July 2012, Ms. Dent served as Vice President, Product Management of the Application Performance Management Solutions division of Compuware, and as Vice President, Product Management of Gomez, a company specializing in monitoring and managing website data and web application performance, from December 2008 to November 2010. Previously, Ms. Dent served as Senior Vice President of Marketing for Ounce Labs, a security software company from June 2006 to September 2008. Earlier in her career, Ms. Dent served as Vice President, Business Development at Rational IBM, Vice President and General Manager, Rational Suite Business Unit, of Rational Software and held other sales, marketing and product management positions at Interleaf and IBM. Ms. Dent holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Rhode Island.

Non-Employee Directors

Richard D’Amore has served as a member of our board of directors since April 2015. Mr. D’Amore has been a General Partner of North Bridge Venture Partners, an early-stage venture capital and growth equity firm, since its inception in 1994. From 1982 until starting North Bridge, Mr. D’Amore served in various roles at Hambro International Equity Partners. Previously, Mr. D’Amore worked as a consultant at Bain and Company and as a certified public accountant with Arthur Young and Company. Mr. D’Amore has served as a member of the board of directors of Veeco Instruments, Inc., a developer and manufacturer of electronics equipment, since 1990. From 1997 to 2010, Mr. D’Amore served as a member of the board of directors of Phase Forward Incorporated, a provider of software solutions for clinical trial and drug safety monitoring that was acquired by Oracle Corporation. Mr. D’Amore holds a B.S. in business from Northeastern University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. Our board of directors believes that Mr. D’Amore’s broad entrepreneurial experience and his extensive service on public company boards qualify him to serve on our board of directors.

Bruns Grayson has served as a member of our board of directors since 2011. Mr. Grayson is a managing partner at ABS Ventures, a venture capital firm, where he has managed all of the firm’s venture capital partnerships

 

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since 1983. Mr. Grayson began his career as a venture capitalist in 1981 at Adler & Co., a venture capital firm. Previously, Mr. Grayson was an associate at McKinsey and Co., a management consulting firm. From May 2009 to December 2013, Mr. Grayson served as a member of the board of directors of Active Network, Inc., a provider of cloud computing applications. Mr. Grayson holds a B.A. in history from Harvard College, an M.A. in politics and philosophy from Oxford University and a J.D. from the University of Virginia Law School. Our board of directors believes that Mr. Grayson’s experience investing in technology business and his service on numerous private and public company boards qualify him to serve on our board of directors.

David Henshall has served a member of our board of directors since July 2015. Mr. Henshall has served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Citrix Systems, Inc., a provider of workplace mobility solutions, since September 2011 and as Ci